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A (very short) introduction to buildings

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A (very short) introduction to buildings. / Everitt, Brent.

In: Expositiones Mathematicae, Vol. 32, No. 3, 2014, p. 221-247.

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Harvard

Everitt, B 2014, 'A (very short) introduction to buildings', Expositiones Mathematicae, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 221-247. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exmath.2013.10.001

APA

Everitt, B. (2014). A (very short) introduction to buildings. Expositiones Mathematicae, 32(3), 221-247. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exmath.2013.10.001

Vancouver

Everitt B. A (very short) introduction to buildings. Expositiones Mathematicae. 2014;32(3):221-247. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exmath.2013.10.001

Author

Everitt, Brent. / A (very short) introduction to buildings. In: Expositiones Mathematicae. 2014 ; Vol. 32, No. 3. pp. 221-247.

Bibtex - Download

@article{33727bb0f1ac44c5932fb975227b8272,
title = "A (very short) introduction to buildings",
abstract = "These lectures are an informal elementary introduction to buildings. They are written for, and by, a non-expert. The aim is to get to the definition of a building and feel that it is an entirely natural thing. To maintain the lecture style examples have replaced proofs. The notes at the end indicate where these proofs can be found. The lectures are a distillation of the first few chapters of the books of Abramenko and Brown and of Ronan. Lecture 1 illustrates all the features of a building in the context of an example, but without mentioning any building terminology. In principle anyone could read this. Lectures 2-4 firm-up and generalize these specifics: Coxeter groups appear in Lecture 2, chambers systems in Lecture 3 and the definition of a building in Lecture 4. Lecture 5 addresses where buildings come from by describing the first important example: the spherical building of an algebraic group.",
keywords = "Building, Coxeter group, Chamber system, Algebraic group",
author = "Brent Everitt",
note = "(c) 2013 Elsevier. This is an author produced version of a paper published in Expositiones Mathematicae. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1016/j.exmath.2013.10.001",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "221--247",
journal = "Expositiones Mathematicae",
issn = "0723-0869",
publisher = "Urban und Fischer Verlag Jena",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - A (very short) introduction to buildings

AU - Everitt, Brent

N1 - (c) 2013 Elsevier. This is an author produced version of a paper published in Expositiones Mathematicae. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - These lectures are an informal elementary introduction to buildings. They are written for, and by, a non-expert. The aim is to get to the definition of a building and feel that it is an entirely natural thing. To maintain the lecture style examples have replaced proofs. The notes at the end indicate where these proofs can be found. The lectures are a distillation of the first few chapters of the books of Abramenko and Brown and of Ronan. Lecture 1 illustrates all the features of a building in the context of an example, but without mentioning any building terminology. In principle anyone could read this. Lectures 2-4 firm-up and generalize these specifics: Coxeter groups appear in Lecture 2, chambers systems in Lecture 3 and the definition of a building in Lecture 4. Lecture 5 addresses where buildings come from by describing the first important example: the spherical building of an algebraic group.

AB - These lectures are an informal elementary introduction to buildings. They are written for, and by, a non-expert. The aim is to get to the definition of a building and feel that it is an entirely natural thing. To maintain the lecture style examples have replaced proofs. The notes at the end indicate where these proofs can be found. The lectures are a distillation of the first few chapters of the books of Abramenko and Brown and of Ronan. Lecture 1 illustrates all the features of a building in the context of an example, but without mentioning any building terminology. In principle anyone could read this. Lectures 2-4 firm-up and generalize these specifics: Coxeter groups appear in Lecture 2, chambers systems in Lecture 3 and the definition of a building in Lecture 4. Lecture 5 addresses where buildings come from by describing the first important example: the spherical building of an algebraic group.

KW - Building

KW - Coxeter group

KW - Chamber system

KW - Algebraic group

U2 - 10.1016/j.exmath.2013.10.001

DO - 10.1016/j.exmath.2013.10.001

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 221

EP - 247

JO - Expositiones Mathematicae

JF - Expositiones Mathematicae

SN - 0723-0869

IS - 3

ER -