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A visual M170 effect of morphological complexity

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A visual M170 effect of morphological complexity. / Zweig, Eytan; Pylkkänen, Liina.

In: Language and Cognitive Processes, Vol. 24, No. 3, 2009, p. 412-439.

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Harvard

Zweig, E & Pylkkänen, L 2009, 'A visual M170 effect of morphological complexity', Language and Cognitive Processes, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 412-439. https://doi.org/10.1080/01690960802180420

APA

Zweig, E., & Pylkkänen, L. (2009). A visual M170 effect of morphological complexity. Language and Cognitive Processes, 24(3), 412-439. https://doi.org/10.1080/01690960802180420

Vancouver

Zweig E, Pylkkänen L. A visual M170 effect of morphological complexity. Language and Cognitive Processes. 2009;24(3):412-439. https://doi.org/10.1080/01690960802180420

Author

Zweig, Eytan ; Pylkkänen, Liina. / A visual M170 effect of morphological complexity. In: Language and Cognitive Processes. 2009 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 412-439.

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@article{bcfe5a80ff3b406c93381c551665e1cc,
title = "A visual M170 effect of morphological complexity",
abstract = "Recent masked priming studies on visual word recognition have suggested that morphological decomposition is performed prelexically, purely on the basis of the orthographic properties of the word form. Given this, one might expect morphological complexity to modulate early visual evoked activity in electromagnetic measures. We investigated the neural bases of morphological decomposition with magnetoencephalography (MEG). In two experiments, we manipulated morphological complexity in single word lexical decision without priming, once using suffixed words and once using prefixed words. We found that morphologically complex forms display larger amplitudes in the M170, the same component that has been implicated for letterstring and face effects in previous MEG studies. Although letterstring effects have been reported to be left-lateral, we found a right-lateral effect of morphological complexity, suggesting that both hemispheres may be involved in early analysis of word forms.",
keywords = "Lexicon, MEG, M170, Morphological decomposition, EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS, LETTER-STRING PERCEPTION, FUSIFORM FACE AREA, WORD FORM AREA, TIME-COURSE, NEUROMAGNETIC EVIDENCE, TEMPORAL CORTEX, LEXICAL STORAGE, EYE-MOVEMENTS, MEG-DATA",
author = "Eytan Zweig and Liina Pylkk{\"a}nen",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1080/01690960802180420",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "412--439",
journal = "Language and Cognitive Processes",
issn = "0169-0965",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - A visual M170 effect of morphological complexity

AU - Zweig, Eytan

AU - Pylkkänen, Liina

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Recent masked priming studies on visual word recognition have suggested that morphological decomposition is performed prelexically, purely on the basis of the orthographic properties of the word form. Given this, one might expect morphological complexity to modulate early visual evoked activity in electromagnetic measures. We investigated the neural bases of morphological decomposition with magnetoencephalography (MEG). In two experiments, we manipulated morphological complexity in single word lexical decision without priming, once using suffixed words and once using prefixed words. We found that morphologically complex forms display larger amplitudes in the M170, the same component that has been implicated for letterstring and face effects in previous MEG studies. Although letterstring effects have been reported to be left-lateral, we found a right-lateral effect of morphological complexity, suggesting that both hemispheres may be involved in early analysis of word forms.

AB - Recent masked priming studies on visual word recognition have suggested that morphological decomposition is performed prelexically, purely on the basis of the orthographic properties of the word form. Given this, one might expect morphological complexity to modulate early visual evoked activity in electromagnetic measures. We investigated the neural bases of morphological decomposition with magnetoencephalography (MEG). In two experiments, we manipulated morphological complexity in single word lexical decision without priming, once using suffixed words and once using prefixed words. We found that morphologically complex forms display larger amplitudes in the M170, the same component that has been implicated for letterstring and face effects in previous MEG studies. Although letterstring effects have been reported to be left-lateral, we found a right-lateral effect of morphological complexity, suggesting that both hemispheres may be involved in early analysis of word forms.

KW - Lexicon

KW - MEG

KW - M170

KW - Morphological decomposition

KW - EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS

KW - LETTER-STRING PERCEPTION

KW - FUSIFORM FACE AREA

KW - WORD FORM AREA

KW - TIME-COURSE

KW - NEUROMAGNETIC EVIDENCE

KW - TEMPORAL CORTEX

KW - LEXICAL STORAGE

KW - EYE-MOVEMENTS

KW - MEG-DATA

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=62149103950&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/01690960802180420

DO - 10.1080/01690960802180420

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 412

EP - 439

JO - Language and Cognitive Processes

JF - Language and Cognitive Processes

SN - 0169-0965

IS - 3

ER -