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ARE EXPOSURE PREDICTIONS, USED FOR THE PRIORITISATION OF PHARMACEUTICALS IN THE ENVIRONMENT, FIT FOR PURPOSE?

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JournalEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistry
DateAccepted/In press - 26 Apr 2017
DatePublished (current) - 6 May 2017
Number of pages41
Pages (from-to)1-41
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Prioritisation methodologies are often used for identifying those pharmaceuticals that pose the greatest risk to the natural environment and to focus laboratory testing or environmental monitoring towards pharmaceuticals of greatest concern. Risk-based prioritisation approaches, employing models to derive exposure concentrations, are commonly used but the reliability of these models is unclear. The present study evaluated the accuracy of exposure models commonly used for pharmaceutical prioritisation. Targeted monitoring was conducted for 95 pharmaceuticals in the Rivers Foss and Ouse in the City of York, UK. Predicted environmental concentration (PEC) ranges were estimated based on localised prescription, hydrological data, reported metabolism and wastewater treatment plant (WwTP) removal rates, and were compared to measured environmental concentrations (MECs). For the River Foss, PECs, obtained using highest metabolism and lowest WwTP removal, were similar to MECs. In contrast, this trend was not observed for the River Ouse, possibly due to pharmaceutical inputs beyond our modelling. Pharmaceuticals were ranked by risk based on either MECs or PECs. With two exceptions (dextromethorphan and diphenhydramine), risk ranking based on both MECs and PECs produced similar results in the River Foss. Overall, these findings indicate that PECs may well be appropriate for prioritisation of pharmaceuticals in the environment when robust and local data on the system of interest are available and reflective of most source inputs to the system. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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© 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details.

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