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Badgers, Meles meles, discriminate between neighbour, alien and self scent

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Badgers, Meles meles, discriminate between neighbour, alien and self scent. / Palphramand, Kate L.; White, Piran C L.

In: ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR, Vol. 74, No. 3, 09.2007, p. 429-436.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Palphramand, KL & White, PCL 2007, 'Badgers, Meles meles, discriminate between neighbour, alien and self scent', ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR, vol. 74, no. 3, pp. 429-436. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2006.10.026

APA

Palphramand, K. L., & White, P. C. L. (2007). Badgers, Meles meles, discriminate between neighbour, alien and self scent. ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR, 74(3), 429-436. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2006.10.026

Vancouver

Palphramand KL, White PCL. Badgers, Meles meles, discriminate between neighbour, alien and self scent. ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR. 2007 Sep;74(3):429-436. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2006.10.026

Author

Palphramand, Kate L. ; White, Piran C L. / Badgers, Meles meles, discriminate between neighbour, alien and self scent. In: ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR. 2007 ; Vol. 74, No. 3. pp. 429-436.

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@article{442c445a0c494e92865f466482fb4e45,
title = "Badgers, Meles meles, discriminate between neighbour, alien and self scent",
abstract = "For group- living animals, the ability to discriminate between familiar individuals and strangers may allow reduced agonistic behaviour between holders of neighbouring territories, termed the `dear enemy' effect. We tested the hypothesis that Eurasian badgers can discriminate between self-, neighbour- and alien( unknown) group faeces placed near their main sett. We carried out a series of controlled field experiments over a 12- month period at the main setts of three badger groups occupying contiguous territories. The experimental design used two different treatments: `alien treatment' involved the display of self- group scents with alien- group scents and `neighbour treatment' involved the display of self- group scents with neighbour-group scents. Badgers showed heightened behavioural responses towards alien- compared with self- group scents, but there was no significant difference in response to neighbour- relative to self- group scents. The relative responses towards alien- group scents were greatest during the breeding seasons, but there were no significant seasonal differences in the responses to neighbour- group versus self- group scents. In undisturbed badger populations, levels of aggression between neighbouring territory- holders are likely to be kept relatively low through neighbour recognition. However, increased levels of aggression will be shown towards dispersing or itinerant ( alien) badgers, especially during periods such as the breeding season when the potential threats to the long- term fitness of territory owners are greatest. This behaviour may reduce the effectiveness of management strategies involving the culling of group- living wildlife hosts to reduce levels of livestock or human disease. (C) 2007 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "dear enemy effect, Eurasian badger, faeces, field experiment, Meles meles, scent recognition, territoriality, wildlife disease",
author = "Palphramand, {Kate L.} and White, {Piran C L}",
year = "2007",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.anbehav.2006.10.026",
language = "English",
volume = "74",
pages = "429--436",
journal = "ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR",
issn = "0003-3472",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "3",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Badgers, Meles meles, discriminate between neighbour, alien and self scent

AU - Palphramand, Kate L.

AU - White, Piran C L

PY - 2007/9

Y1 - 2007/9

N2 - For group- living animals, the ability to discriminate between familiar individuals and strangers may allow reduced agonistic behaviour between holders of neighbouring territories, termed the `dear enemy' effect. We tested the hypothesis that Eurasian badgers can discriminate between self-, neighbour- and alien( unknown) group faeces placed near their main sett. We carried out a series of controlled field experiments over a 12- month period at the main setts of three badger groups occupying contiguous territories. The experimental design used two different treatments: `alien treatment' involved the display of self- group scents with alien- group scents and `neighbour treatment' involved the display of self- group scents with neighbour-group scents. Badgers showed heightened behavioural responses towards alien- compared with self- group scents, but there was no significant difference in response to neighbour- relative to self- group scents. The relative responses towards alien- group scents were greatest during the breeding seasons, but there were no significant seasonal differences in the responses to neighbour- group versus self- group scents. In undisturbed badger populations, levels of aggression between neighbouring territory- holders are likely to be kept relatively low through neighbour recognition. However, increased levels of aggression will be shown towards dispersing or itinerant ( alien) badgers, especially during periods such as the breeding season when the potential threats to the long- term fitness of territory owners are greatest. This behaviour may reduce the effectiveness of management strategies involving the culling of group- living wildlife hosts to reduce levels of livestock or human disease. (C) 2007 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - For group- living animals, the ability to discriminate between familiar individuals and strangers may allow reduced agonistic behaviour between holders of neighbouring territories, termed the `dear enemy' effect. We tested the hypothesis that Eurasian badgers can discriminate between self-, neighbour- and alien( unknown) group faeces placed near their main sett. We carried out a series of controlled field experiments over a 12- month period at the main setts of three badger groups occupying contiguous territories. The experimental design used two different treatments: `alien treatment' involved the display of self- group scents with alien- group scents and `neighbour treatment' involved the display of self- group scents with neighbour-group scents. Badgers showed heightened behavioural responses towards alien- compared with self- group scents, but there was no significant difference in response to neighbour- relative to self- group scents. The relative responses towards alien- group scents were greatest during the breeding seasons, but there were no significant seasonal differences in the responses to neighbour- group versus self- group scents. In undisturbed badger populations, levels of aggression between neighbouring territory- holders are likely to be kept relatively low through neighbour recognition. However, increased levels of aggression will be shown towards dispersing or itinerant ( alien) badgers, especially during periods such as the breeding season when the potential threats to the long- term fitness of territory owners are greatest. This behaviour may reduce the effectiveness of management strategies involving the culling of group- living wildlife hosts to reduce levels of livestock or human disease. (C) 2007 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - dear enemy effect

KW - Eurasian badger

KW - faeces

KW - field experiment

KW - Meles meles

KW - scent recognition

KW - territoriality

KW - wildlife disease

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34548618631&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.anbehav.2006.10.026

DO - 10.1016/j.anbehav.2006.10.026

M3 - Article

VL - 74

SP - 429

EP - 436

JO - ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR

JF - ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR

SN - 0003-3472

IS - 3

ER -