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Beginning secondary school teachers' perceptions of pupil misbehaviour in Spain

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Beginning secondary school teachers' perceptions of pupil misbehaviour in Spain. / Kyriacou, C.; Ortega Martin, J.L.

In: Teacher Development, Vol. 14, No. 4, 11.2010, p. 415-426.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Kyriacou, C & Ortega Martin, JL 2010, 'Beginning secondary school teachers' perceptions of pupil misbehaviour in Spain', Teacher Development, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 415-426. https://doi.org/10.1080/13664530.2010.533481

APA

Kyriacou, C., & Ortega Martin, J. L. (2010). Beginning secondary school teachers' perceptions of pupil misbehaviour in Spain. Teacher Development, 14(4), 415-426. https://doi.org/10.1080/13664530.2010.533481

Vancouver

Kyriacou C, Ortega Martin JL. Beginning secondary school teachers' perceptions of pupil misbehaviour in Spain. Teacher Development. 2010 Nov;14(4):415-426. https://doi.org/10.1080/13664530.2010.533481

Author

Kyriacou, C. ; Ortega Martin, J.L. / Beginning secondary school teachers' perceptions of pupil misbehaviour in Spain. In: Teacher Development. 2010 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 415-426.

Bibtex - Download

@article{73af272dd60b4c978122a14d7b4095dd,
title = "Beginning secondary school teachers' perceptions of pupil misbehaviour in Spain",
abstract = "This study used a questionnaire to identify the perceptions of pupil misbehaviour held by a sample of 176 secondary school student teachers attending a one-year initial teacher training course in Spain. The main factor accounting for secondary school pupils' misbehaviour in lessons was reported to be 'parents who do not instil pro-school values in their children'. The most frequently reported form of misbehaviour in a typical secondary school lesson was reported to be 'talking out of turn'. The most effective disciplinary strategy reported was 'have a conversation with the pupil after the lesson'. The findings are broadly in line with similar research conducted in the UK, although there are some notable differences. In addition, over a quarter of the sample reported being 'a bit confident' or 'not at all confident' in 'keeping pupils engaged', and this figure rose to over a half of the sample in 'dealing swiftly with misbehaviour'. ",
keywords = "misbehaviour, Spain, dicipline",
author = "C. Kyriacou and {Ortega Martin}, J.L.",
year = "2010",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1080/13664530.2010.533481",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "415--426",
journal = "Teacher Development",
issn = "1366-4530",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Beginning secondary school teachers' perceptions of pupil misbehaviour in Spain

AU - Kyriacou, C.

AU - Ortega Martin, J.L.

PY - 2010/11

Y1 - 2010/11

N2 - This study used a questionnaire to identify the perceptions of pupil misbehaviour held by a sample of 176 secondary school student teachers attending a one-year initial teacher training course in Spain. The main factor accounting for secondary school pupils' misbehaviour in lessons was reported to be 'parents who do not instil pro-school values in their children'. The most frequently reported form of misbehaviour in a typical secondary school lesson was reported to be 'talking out of turn'. The most effective disciplinary strategy reported was 'have a conversation with the pupil after the lesson'. The findings are broadly in line with similar research conducted in the UK, although there are some notable differences. In addition, over a quarter of the sample reported being 'a bit confident' or 'not at all confident' in 'keeping pupils engaged', and this figure rose to over a half of the sample in 'dealing swiftly with misbehaviour'.

AB - This study used a questionnaire to identify the perceptions of pupil misbehaviour held by a sample of 176 secondary school student teachers attending a one-year initial teacher training course in Spain. The main factor accounting for secondary school pupils' misbehaviour in lessons was reported to be 'parents who do not instil pro-school values in their children'. The most frequently reported form of misbehaviour in a typical secondary school lesson was reported to be 'talking out of turn'. The most effective disciplinary strategy reported was 'have a conversation with the pupil after the lesson'. The findings are broadly in line with similar research conducted in the UK, although there are some notable differences. In addition, over a quarter of the sample reported being 'a bit confident' or 'not at all confident' in 'keeping pupils engaged', and this figure rose to over a half of the sample in 'dealing swiftly with misbehaviour'.

KW - misbehaviour

KW - Spain

KW - dicipline

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78650237419&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/13664530.2010.533481

DO - 10.1080/13664530.2010.533481

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 415

EP - 426

JO - Teacher Development

JF - Teacher Development

SN - 1366-4530

IS - 4

ER -