By the same authors

From the same journal

From the same journal

Beyond justice: Pufendorf and Locke on the desire for esteem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Full text download(s)

Published copy (DOI)

Author(s)

Department/unit(s)

Publication details

JournalPolitical Theory
DateAccepted/In press - 15 Sep 2018
DateE-pub ahead of print - 12 Nov 2018
DatePublished (current) - 2019
Issue number5
Volume47
Number of pages25
Pages (from-to)699-723
Early online date12/11/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

It is widely accepted that the seventeenth-century natural lawyers constructed the minimal requirement for social coordination between self-seeking individuals animated by the desire for self-preservation. On most interpretations, Grotius and his successors focused on the “perfect” duties (rules of justice) and had little to say about the “imperfect” duties of love and civility. This essay provides an alternative reading of post-Grotian natural law by reconstructing Pufendorf’s and Locke’s understanding of how the duties of civility and love might be realised in civil society. The essay argues that, for Pufendorf and Locke, the desire for esteem offers an explanation of how people recognize the content of the reciprocal duties of social morality and motivate themselves to act accordingly. The reconstruction of their views on the beneficial effects of esteem-seeking points towards a new interpretation of how, and why, philosop interest in an economy of esteem and the social nature of the self emerged, prior to their treatment by eighteenth-century authors such as Hume and Smith.

Bibliographical note

© The Author(s) 2018. This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details.

    Research areas

  • Esteem, justice, natural law, recognition, self-preservation

Discover related content

Find related publications, people, projects, datasets and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations