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Carbon dioxide retrievals from Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment solar occultation measurements

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JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
DatePublished - 3 Feb 2010
Issue number3
Volume115
Number of pages12
Pages (from-to)-
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite (SCISAT-1) was launched into an inclined orbit on 12 August 2003 and is now recording high signal-to-noise 0.02 cm(-1) resolution solar absorption spectra covering 750-4400 cm(-1) (2.3-13 mu m). A procedure has been developed for retrieving average dry air CO2 mole fractions (X-CO2) in the altitude range 7-10 km from the SCISAT-1 spectra. Using the N-2 continuum absorption in a window region near 2500 cm(-1), altitude shifts are applied to the tangent heights retrieved in version 2.2 SCISAT-1 processing, while cloudy or aerosol-impacted measurements are eliminated. Monthly mean X-CO2 covering 60 degrees S to 60 degrees N latitude for February 2004 to March 2008 has been analyzed with consistent trends inferred in both hemispheres. The ACE X-CO2 time series have been compared with previously reported surface network measurements, predictions based on upper tropospheric aircraft measurements, and space-based measurements. The retrieved X-CO2 from the ACE-FTS spectra are higher on average by a factor of 1.07 +/- 0.025 in the Northern Hemisphere and by a factor of 1.09 +/- 0.019 on average in the Southern Hemisphere compared to surface station measurements covering the same time span. The ACE-derived trend is similar to 0.2% per year higher than measured at surface stations during the same observation period.

    Research areas

  • COLLISION-INDUCED ABSORPTION, FOURIER-TRANSFORM SPECTROMETER, UPPER TROPOSPHERE, LOWER STRATOSPHERE, SOURCE INVERSIONS, ERROR ANALYSIS, CO2 BANDS, SPECTRA, INSTRUMENT, PROFILES

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