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Child Well-being in the Pacific Rim

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Publication details

JournalChild Indicators Research
DatePublished - 1 Jul 2010
Issue number3
Volume3
Number of pages16
Pages (from-to)367-383
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

This study extends previous efforts to compare the well-being of children using multi-dimensional indicators derived from sample survey and administrative series to thirteen countries in the Pacific Rim. The framework for the analysis of child well-being is to organise 46 indicators into 21 components and organise the components into 6 domains: material situation, health, education, subjective well-being, living environment, as well as risk and safety. Overall, Japan, Singapore and Taiwan have the highest child well-being and Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines the lowest. However, there are substantial variations between the domains. Japan and Korea perform best on the material well-being of children and also do well on health and education but they have the lowest subjective well-being among their children by some margin. There is a relationship between child well-being and GDP per capita but children in China have higher well-being than you would expect given their GDP and children in Australia have lower well-being. The analysis is constrained by missing data particularly that the Health Behaviour of School-Aged Children Survey is not undertaken in any of these countries.

Bibliographical note

© Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010. This is an author produced version of the article published. This paper has been peer-reviewed but does not include the journal pagination. The original publication is available at springerlink.com: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12187-010-9064-4

    Research areas

  • Child well-being, Pacific Rim, Far-East, multi-dimensional index

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