By the same authors

Chivalry

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Published copy (DOI)

Author(s)

Department/unit(s)

Publication details

Title of host publicationGeoffrey Chaucer in Context
DateAccepted/In press - 2017
DateE-pub ahead of print - Jun 2019
DatePublished (current) - 11 Jul 2019
Pages331
Number of pages336
PublisherCambridge University Press
EditorsIan Johnson
Original languageEnglish
ISBN (Print)9781107035645

Abstract

In the Middle Ages, ‘chivalry’ was a collective noun referring to mounted and fully armed knights and squires. But in modern English, we use the term for the wider martial and courtly culture of those people, and in particular for the ideals of knighthood which are now associated principally with a romantic vision of elegant and civilised masculinity. Yet these assumptions about knightly ideals are based upon a partial reading of the surviving medieval sources, downplaying the overriding importance of more martial qualities like prowess, courage and the competition for honour, and more importantly constant debate about the norms of medieval aristocratic masculinity

Discover related content

Find related publications, people, projects, datasets and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations