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From the same journal

Choice in the context of informal care-giving

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Choice in the context of informal care-giving. / Arksey, Hilary; Glendinning, Caroline.

In: Health and Social Care in the Community, Vol. 15, No. 2, 03.2007, p. 165-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Arksey, H & Glendinning, C 2007, 'Choice in the context of informal care-giving', Health and Social Care in the Community, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 165-175. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2524.2006.00671.x

APA

Arksey, H., & Glendinning, C. (2007). Choice in the context of informal care-giving. Health and Social Care in the Community, 15(2), 165-175. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2524.2006.00671.x

Vancouver

Arksey H, Glendinning C. Choice in the context of informal care-giving. Health and Social Care in the Community. 2007 Mar;15(2):165-175. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2524.2006.00671.x

Author

Arksey, Hilary ; Glendinning, Caroline. / Choice in the context of informal care-giving. In: Health and Social Care in the Community. 2007 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 165-175.

Bibtex - Download

@article{4ad0536755fb4993b5d93158ed35b495,
title = "Choice in the context of informal care-giving",
abstract = "Extending choice and control for social care service users is a central feature of current English policies. However, these have comparatively little to say about choice in relation to the informal carers of relatives, friends or older people who are disabled or sick. To explore the realities of choice as experienced by carers, the present paper reviews research published in English since 1985 about three situations in which carers are likely to face choices: receiving social services; the entry of an older person to long-term care; and combining paid work and care. Thirteen electronic databases were searched, covering both the health and social care fields. Databases included: ASSIA; IBSS; Social Care Online; ISI Web of Knowledge; Medline; HMIC Sociological Abstracts; INGENTA; ZETOC; and the National Research Register. The search strategy combined terms that: (1) identified individuals with care-giving responsibilities; (2) identified people receiving help and support; and (3) described the process of interest (e.g. choice, decision-making and self-determination). The search identified comparatively few relevant studies, and so was supplemented by the findings from another recent review of empirical research on carers' choices about combining work and care. The research evidence suggests that carers' choices are shaped by two sets of factors: one relates to the nature of the care-giving relationship; and the second consists of wider organisational factors. A number of reasons may explain the invisibility of choice for carers in current policy proposals for increasing choice. In particular, it is suggested that underpinning conceptual models of the relationship between carers and formal service providers shape the extent to which carers can be offered choice and control on similar terms to service users. In particular, the exercise of choice by carers is likely to be highly problematic if it involves relinquishing some unpaid care-giving activities.",
keywords = "choice, decision-making, informal carer, policy, OLDER-PEOPLE, COMMUNITY CARE, EXPERIENCES, SERVICES, NEEDS, EMPLOYMENT, DECISIONS, ADMISSION, DEMENTIA, MANAGERS",
author = "Hilary Arksey and Caroline Glendinning",
note = "Arksey, H. and Glendinning, C. (2007) Choice in the context of informal care-giving, Health and Social Care in the Community, 15, 2, 165-75.This is an author produced version of the article published. This paper has been peer-reviewed but does not include the final publisher proof-corrections or journal pagination. Acknowledgement to Blackwell Publishing and the journal, Health and Social Care in the Community for permitting this version to be displayed.",
year = "2007",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2524.2006.00671.x",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "165--175",
journal = "Health and Social Care in the Community",
issn = "0966-0410",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Choice in the context of informal care-giving

AU - Arksey, Hilary

AU - Glendinning, Caroline

N1 - Arksey, H. and Glendinning, C. (2007) Choice in the context of informal care-giving, Health and Social Care in the Community, 15, 2, 165-75.This is an author produced version of the article published. This paper has been peer-reviewed but does not include the final publisher proof-corrections or journal pagination. Acknowledgement to Blackwell Publishing and the journal, Health and Social Care in the Community for permitting this version to be displayed.

PY - 2007/3

Y1 - 2007/3

N2 - Extending choice and control for social care service users is a central feature of current English policies. However, these have comparatively little to say about choice in relation to the informal carers of relatives, friends or older people who are disabled or sick. To explore the realities of choice as experienced by carers, the present paper reviews research published in English since 1985 about three situations in which carers are likely to face choices: receiving social services; the entry of an older person to long-term care; and combining paid work and care. Thirteen electronic databases were searched, covering both the health and social care fields. Databases included: ASSIA; IBSS; Social Care Online; ISI Web of Knowledge; Medline; HMIC Sociological Abstracts; INGENTA; ZETOC; and the National Research Register. The search strategy combined terms that: (1) identified individuals with care-giving responsibilities; (2) identified people receiving help and support; and (3) described the process of interest (e.g. choice, decision-making and self-determination). The search identified comparatively few relevant studies, and so was supplemented by the findings from another recent review of empirical research on carers' choices about combining work and care. The research evidence suggests that carers' choices are shaped by two sets of factors: one relates to the nature of the care-giving relationship; and the second consists of wider organisational factors. A number of reasons may explain the invisibility of choice for carers in current policy proposals for increasing choice. In particular, it is suggested that underpinning conceptual models of the relationship between carers and formal service providers shape the extent to which carers can be offered choice and control on similar terms to service users. In particular, the exercise of choice by carers is likely to be highly problematic if it involves relinquishing some unpaid care-giving activities.

AB - Extending choice and control for social care service users is a central feature of current English policies. However, these have comparatively little to say about choice in relation to the informal carers of relatives, friends or older people who are disabled or sick. To explore the realities of choice as experienced by carers, the present paper reviews research published in English since 1985 about three situations in which carers are likely to face choices: receiving social services; the entry of an older person to long-term care; and combining paid work and care. Thirteen electronic databases were searched, covering both the health and social care fields. Databases included: ASSIA; IBSS; Social Care Online; ISI Web of Knowledge; Medline; HMIC Sociological Abstracts; INGENTA; ZETOC; and the National Research Register. The search strategy combined terms that: (1) identified individuals with care-giving responsibilities; (2) identified people receiving help and support; and (3) described the process of interest (e.g. choice, decision-making and self-determination). The search identified comparatively few relevant studies, and so was supplemented by the findings from another recent review of empirical research on carers' choices about combining work and care. The research evidence suggests that carers' choices are shaped by two sets of factors: one relates to the nature of the care-giving relationship; and the second consists of wider organisational factors. A number of reasons may explain the invisibility of choice for carers in current policy proposals for increasing choice. In particular, it is suggested that underpinning conceptual models of the relationship between carers and formal service providers shape the extent to which carers can be offered choice and control on similar terms to service users. In particular, the exercise of choice by carers is likely to be highly problematic if it involves relinquishing some unpaid care-giving activities.

KW - choice

KW - decision-making

KW - informal carer

KW - policy

KW - OLDER-PEOPLE

KW - COMMUNITY CARE

KW - EXPERIENCES

KW - SERVICES

KW - NEEDS

KW - EMPLOYMENT

KW - DECISIONS

KW - ADMISSION

KW - DEMENTIA

KW - MANAGERS

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2524.2006.00671.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2524.2006.00671.x

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 165

EP - 175

JO - Health and Social Care in the Community

T2 - Health and Social Care in the Community

JF - Health and Social Care in the Community

SN - 0966-0410

IS - 2

ER -