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Common Worship

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JournalFaith and Philosophy
DateAccepted/In press - 21 Mar 2018
DateE-pub ahead of print - 12 Jun 2018
DatePublished (current) - Jul 2018
Issue number3
Volume35
Number of pages27
Pages (from-to)299-325
Early online date12/06/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

People of faith, particularly in the Judeo-Christian tradition, worship corporately at least as often, if not more so, than they do individually. Why do they do this? There are, of course, many reasons, some having to do with personal preference and others having to do with the theology of worship. But, in this paper, we explore one reason, a philosophical reason, which, despite recent work on the philosophy of liturgy, has gone under-appreciated. In particular, we argue that corporate worship enables a person to come to know God better than they would otherwise know him in individual worship.

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