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From the same journal

COMMUNITY PHARMACIST LED MEDICATION REVIEWS IN THE UK: A SCOPING REVIEW OF THE MEDICINES USE REVIEW AND THE NEW MEDICINE SERVICE LITERATURES

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JournalResearch in Social and Administrative Pharmacy
DateAccepted/In press - 14 Apr 2019
DateE-pub ahead of print (current) - 19 Apr 2019
Number of pages31
Pages (from-to)1-31
Early online date19/04/19
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Background: Medicines Use Reviews (MURs) and the New Medicine Service (NMS) are services delivered by UK community pharmacists to improve adherence, improve patient understanding of their medicines and reduce medicines wastage.
Aim: In this scoping review we aim to identify, map and critically examine the nature of existing empirical evidence in peer reviewed journals relating to MUR and NMS consultations.
Method: Systematic searches identified the available MUR and NMS empirical literature. We sought data on barriers and facilitators to conducting MUR or NMS consultations, the perceptions of pharmacists and patients, the conduct of consultations, and outcomes of consultations. Searches from 2005 (when MURs were introduced) to May 2018 were conducted in MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase and Scopus databases. Data were extracted into Excel for examination of study characteristics, participant characteristics, type of intervention/services delivered and key study quantitative and/or qualitative findings.
Results: Forty-one papers from 37 studies met the inclusion criteria: 28 papers were of MURs, 10 of NMS and 3 for both services. Studies focused on the introduction and implementation of these services, with little attention to outcomes for patients; effectiveness was not evaluated beyond in a single NMS RCT. Observational data indicated that pharmacists and patients view MURs and the NMS positively, despite challenges implementing these services and apparent lack of communication between pharmacists and GPs. Consultations were reported to be short, typically 10-12 minutes, characterised by limited engagement with patients and their health problems. The extent and nature of advice on health behaviours during consultations or other content was rarely examined.
Conclusion: The research literature on MURs and the NMS has developed slowly. There is much scope for further research attention to developing more patient-centred care.

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