By the same authors

From the same journal

From the same journal

Continuity, commitment and context: adult siblings of people with autism plus learning disability

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Continuity, commitment and context : adult siblings of people with autism plus learning disability. / Tozer, Rosemary; Atkin, Karl; Wenham, Aniela.

In: Health & Social Care in the Community, Vol. 21, No. 5, 09.2013, p. 480-488.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Tozer, R, Atkin, K & Wenham, A 2013, 'Continuity, commitment and context: adult siblings of people with autism plus learning disability', Health & Social Care in the Community, vol. 21, no. 5, pp. 480-488. https://doi.org/10.1111/hsc.12034

APA

Tozer, R., Atkin, K., & Wenham, A. (2013). Continuity, commitment and context: adult siblings of people with autism plus learning disability. Health & Social Care in the Community, 21(5), 480-488. https://doi.org/10.1111/hsc.12034

Vancouver

Tozer R, Atkin K, Wenham A. Continuity, commitment and context: adult siblings of people with autism plus learning disability. Health & Social Care in the Community. 2013 Sep;21(5):480-488. https://doi.org/10.1111/hsc.12034

Author

Tozer, Rosemary ; Atkin, Karl ; Wenham, Aniela. / Continuity, commitment and context : adult siblings of people with autism plus learning disability. In: Health & Social Care in the Community. 2013 ; Vol. 21, No. 5. pp. 480-488.

Bibtex - Download

@article{6da77424c8fc472fafee405c15f9c312,
title = "Continuity, commitment and context: adult siblings of people with autism plus learning disability",
abstract = "Sibling relationships are usually lifelong and reciprocal. They can assume particular significance when a brother or sister has a learning disability. Until recently, adult siblings of people with disabilities such as severe autism have been ignored by policy, practice and research. This qualitative study contributes to an emerging literature by exploring how adult siblings, who have a brother or sister with autism (plus learning disability) and living in England, give meaning to their family (and caring) relationships and engage with service delivery. We spoke to 21 adult siblings using semi-structured interviews and met with 12 of their siblings with autism. Our analysis, using a broad narrative approach, demonstrates the continuity of the sibling relationship and an enduring personalised commitment. The nature of this relationship, however, is sensitive to context. How non-disabled adult siblings relate to their childhood experience is fundamental when making sense of this, as is their need to fulfil other social and family obligations, alongside their 'sense of duty' to support their disabled brother or sister. Sibling experience was further mediated by negotiating their 'perceived invisibility' in social care policy and practice. Our work concludes that by understanding the way relationships between siblings have developed over time, adult siblings' contribution to the lives of their brother or sister with autism can be better supported for the benefit of both parties. Such an approach would support current policy developments.",
author = "Rosemary Tozer and Karl Atkin and Aniela Wenham",
note = "{\circledC} 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
year = "2013",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1111/hsc.12034",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "480--488",
journal = "Health & Social Care in the Community",
issn = "0966-0410",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "5",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Continuity, commitment and context

T2 - adult siblings of people with autism plus learning disability

AU - Tozer, Rosemary

AU - Atkin, Karl

AU - Wenham, Aniela

N1 - © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2013/9

Y1 - 2013/9

N2 - Sibling relationships are usually lifelong and reciprocal. They can assume particular significance when a brother or sister has a learning disability. Until recently, adult siblings of people with disabilities such as severe autism have been ignored by policy, practice and research. This qualitative study contributes to an emerging literature by exploring how adult siblings, who have a brother or sister with autism (plus learning disability) and living in England, give meaning to their family (and caring) relationships and engage with service delivery. We spoke to 21 adult siblings using semi-structured interviews and met with 12 of their siblings with autism. Our analysis, using a broad narrative approach, demonstrates the continuity of the sibling relationship and an enduring personalised commitment. The nature of this relationship, however, is sensitive to context. How non-disabled adult siblings relate to their childhood experience is fundamental when making sense of this, as is their need to fulfil other social and family obligations, alongside their 'sense of duty' to support their disabled brother or sister. Sibling experience was further mediated by negotiating their 'perceived invisibility' in social care policy and practice. Our work concludes that by understanding the way relationships between siblings have developed over time, adult siblings' contribution to the lives of their brother or sister with autism can be better supported for the benefit of both parties. Such an approach would support current policy developments.

AB - Sibling relationships are usually lifelong and reciprocal. They can assume particular significance when a brother or sister has a learning disability. Until recently, adult siblings of people with disabilities such as severe autism have been ignored by policy, practice and research. This qualitative study contributes to an emerging literature by exploring how adult siblings, who have a brother or sister with autism (plus learning disability) and living in England, give meaning to their family (and caring) relationships and engage with service delivery. We spoke to 21 adult siblings using semi-structured interviews and met with 12 of their siblings with autism. Our analysis, using a broad narrative approach, demonstrates the continuity of the sibling relationship and an enduring personalised commitment. The nature of this relationship, however, is sensitive to context. How non-disabled adult siblings relate to their childhood experience is fundamental when making sense of this, as is their need to fulfil other social and family obligations, alongside their 'sense of duty' to support their disabled brother or sister. Sibling experience was further mediated by negotiating their 'perceived invisibility' in social care policy and practice. Our work concludes that by understanding the way relationships between siblings have developed over time, adult siblings' contribution to the lives of their brother or sister with autism can be better supported for the benefit of both parties. Such an approach would support current policy developments.

U2 - 10.1111/hsc.12034

DO - 10.1111/hsc.12034

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 480

EP - 488

JO - Health & Social Care in the Community

JF - Health & Social Care in the Community

SN - 0966-0410

IS - 5

ER -