By the same authors

From the same journal

Corporate social responsibility and mental health: the Premier League football Imagine Your Goals programme

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Corporate social responsibility and mental health : the Premier League football Imagine Your Goals programme. / Henderson, Claire; O'Hara, Stefanie; Thornicroft, Graham; Webber, Martin.

In: International review of psychiatry, Vol. 26, No. 4, 08.2014, p. 460-466.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Henderson, C, O'Hara, S, Thornicroft, G & Webber, M 2014, 'Corporate social responsibility and mental health: the Premier League football Imagine Your Goals programme', International review of psychiatry, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 460-466. https://doi.org/10.3109/09540261.2014.924486

APA

Henderson, C., O'Hara, S., Thornicroft, G., & Webber, M. (2014). Corporate social responsibility and mental health: the Premier League football Imagine Your Goals programme. International review of psychiatry, 26(4), 460-466. https://doi.org/10.3109/09540261.2014.924486

Vancouver

Henderson C, O'Hara S, Thornicroft G, Webber M. Corporate social responsibility and mental health: the Premier League football Imagine Your Goals programme. International review of psychiatry. 2014 Aug;26(4):460-466. https://doi.org/10.3109/09540261.2014.924486

Author

Henderson, Claire ; O'Hara, Stefanie ; Thornicroft, Graham ; Webber, Martin. / Corporate social responsibility and mental health : the Premier League football Imagine Your Goals programme. In: International review of psychiatry. 2014 ; Vol. 26, No. 4. pp. 460-466.

Bibtex - Download

@article{a7783c6f971040189af675891a34f9bc,
title = "Corporate social responsibility and mental health: the Premier League football Imagine Your Goals programme",
abstract = "Football is increasingly used to facilitate recovery in mental health services, often in partnership with football clubs. However, few clubs have made mental health part of their corporate social responsibility programmes until recently. We report the impact on participants of the 'Imagine Your Goals' programme, run by 16 Premier League football clubs in conjunction with England's Time to Change programme to reduce mental health-related stigma and discrimination. Mixed methods evaluation used pre/post measures of well-being, access to social capital, focus groups held early on and towards the end of the two-year programmes, and questionnaires for coaching staff. There were no significant changes to participants' mental well-being scores between baseline and follow-up, nor to the total number of social resources accessible through their networks. However, there was a statistically significant increase at follow-up in the mean score of the personal skills subscale of the Resource Generator-UK. Participants' individual skills were also higher at follow-up. Qualitative data showed programmes had largely met participants' expectations in terms of socializing, providing structure and improving fitness levels, exceeded expectations in relationships with coaching staff and additional activities, but did not always meet them in improving football skills. Participants varied in their knowledge of exit opportunities, depending on which club's programme they attended. A minority of clubs reported difficulties in recruitment and concerns about planning for the future of the projects. Football clubs and the charitable foundations they set up can successfully deliver programmes to people with mental health problems which improve access to personal skills social capital and have other potential benefits.",
author = "Claire Henderson and Stefanie O'Hara and Graham Thornicroft and Martin Webber",
year = "2014",
month = aug,
doi = "10.3109/09540261.2014.924486",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "460--466",
journal = "International review of psychiatry",
issn = "0954-0261",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Corporate social responsibility and mental health

T2 - the Premier League football Imagine Your Goals programme

AU - Henderson, Claire

AU - O'Hara, Stefanie

AU - Thornicroft, Graham

AU - Webber, Martin

PY - 2014/8

Y1 - 2014/8

N2 - Football is increasingly used to facilitate recovery in mental health services, often in partnership with football clubs. However, few clubs have made mental health part of their corporate social responsibility programmes until recently. We report the impact on participants of the 'Imagine Your Goals' programme, run by 16 Premier League football clubs in conjunction with England's Time to Change programme to reduce mental health-related stigma and discrimination. Mixed methods evaluation used pre/post measures of well-being, access to social capital, focus groups held early on and towards the end of the two-year programmes, and questionnaires for coaching staff. There were no significant changes to participants' mental well-being scores between baseline and follow-up, nor to the total number of social resources accessible through their networks. However, there was a statistically significant increase at follow-up in the mean score of the personal skills subscale of the Resource Generator-UK. Participants' individual skills were also higher at follow-up. Qualitative data showed programmes had largely met participants' expectations in terms of socializing, providing structure and improving fitness levels, exceeded expectations in relationships with coaching staff and additional activities, but did not always meet them in improving football skills. Participants varied in their knowledge of exit opportunities, depending on which club's programme they attended. A minority of clubs reported difficulties in recruitment and concerns about planning for the future of the projects. Football clubs and the charitable foundations they set up can successfully deliver programmes to people with mental health problems which improve access to personal skills social capital and have other potential benefits.

AB - Football is increasingly used to facilitate recovery in mental health services, often in partnership with football clubs. However, few clubs have made mental health part of their corporate social responsibility programmes until recently. We report the impact on participants of the 'Imagine Your Goals' programme, run by 16 Premier League football clubs in conjunction with England's Time to Change programme to reduce mental health-related stigma and discrimination. Mixed methods evaluation used pre/post measures of well-being, access to social capital, focus groups held early on and towards the end of the two-year programmes, and questionnaires for coaching staff. There were no significant changes to participants' mental well-being scores between baseline and follow-up, nor to the total number of social resources accessible through their networks. However, there was a statistically significant increase at follow-up in the mean score of the personal skills subscale of the Resource Generator-UK. Participants' individual skills were also higher at follow-up. Qualitative data showed programmes had largely met participants' expectations in terms of socializing, providing structure and improving fitness levels, exceeded expectations in relationships with coaching staff and additional activities, but did not always meet them in improving football skills. Participants varied in their knowledge of exit opportunities, depending on which club's programme they attended. A minority of clubs reported difficulties in recruitment and concerns about planning for the future of the projects. Football clubs and the charitable foundations they set up can successfully deliver programmes to people with mental health problems which improve access to personal skills social capital and have other potential benefits.

U2 - 10.3109/09540261.2014.924486

DO - 10.3109/09540261.2014.924486

M3 - Article

C2 - 25137112

VL - 26

SP - 460

EP - 466

JO - International review of psychiatry

JF - International review of psychiatry

SN - 0954-0261

IS - 4

ER -