By the same authors

Cost-Effectiveness of a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention for the Prevention of Falls in Older People: The REducing Falls with Orthoses and a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention Trial Findings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Cost-Effectiveness of a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention for the Prevention of Falls in Older People : The REducing Falls with Orthoses and a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention Trial Findings. / Corbacho Martin, Maria Belen; Cockayne, Elizabeth Sarah; Fairhurst, Caroline Marie; Hicks, Kathryn Jane; Keenan, Anne Maree; Lamb, Sarah E; Menz, Hylton B; Redmond, Anthony C; Rodgers, Sara Anita; Scantlebury, Arabella Louise; Watson, Judith M; Torgerson, David John; Hewitt, Catherine Elizabeth; MacIntosh, C.

In: Gerontology, 26.06.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Corbacho Martin, MB, Cockayne, ES, Fairhurst, CM, Hicks, KJ, Keenan, AM, Lamb, SE, Menz, HB, Redmond, AC, Rodgers, SA, Scantlebury, AL, Watson, JM, Torgerson, DJ, Hewitt, CE & MacIntosh, C 2018, 'Cost-Effectiveness of a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention for the Prevention of Falls in Older People: The REducing Falls with Orthoses and a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention Trial Findings', Gerontology. https://doi.org/10.1159/000489171

APA

Corbacho Martin, M. B., Cockayne, E. S., Fairhurst, C. M., Hicks, K. J., Keenan, A. M., Lamb, S. E., ... MacIntosh, C. (2018). Cost-Effectiveness of a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention for the Prevention of Falls in Older People: The REducing Falls with Orthoses and a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention Trial Findings. Gerontology. https://doi.org/10.1159/000489171

Vancouver

Corbacho Martin MB, Cockayne ES, Fairhurst CM, Hicks KJ, Keenan AM, Lamb SE et al. Cost-Effectiveness of a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention for the Prevention of Falls in Older People: The REducing Falls with Orthoses and a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention Trial Findings. Gerontology. 2018 Jun 26. https://doi.org/10.1159/000489171

Author

Corbacho Martin, Maria Belen ; Cockayne, Elizabeth Sarah ; Fairhurst, Caroline Marie ; Hicks, Kathryn Jane ; Keenan, Anne Maree ; Lamb, Sarah E ; Menz, Hylton B ; Redmond, Anthony C ; Rodgers, Sara Anita ; Scantlebury, Arabella Louise ; Watson, Judith M ; Torgerson, David John ; Hewitt, Catherine Elizabeth ; MacIntosh, C. / Cost-Effectiveness of a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention for the Prevention of Falls in Older People : The REducing Falls with Orthoses and a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention Trial Findings. In: Gerontology. 2018.

Bibtex - Download

@article{fb5c6823e0574e239cc6649d22c8ac92,
title = "Cost-Effectiveness of a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention for the Prevention of Falls in Older People: The REducing Falls with Orthoses and a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention Trial Findings",
abstract = "Background: Falls are a major cause of morbidity among older people. Multifaceted interventions may be effective in preventing falls and related fractures. Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness alongside the REducing Falls with Orthoses and a Multifaceted podiatry intervention (REFORM) trial. Methods: REFORM was a pragmatic multicentre cohort randomised controlled trial in England and Ireland; 1,010 participants (> 65 years) were randomised to receive either a podiatry intervention (n = 493), including foot and ankle strengthening exercises, foot orthoses, new footwear if required, and a falls prevention leaflet, or usual podiatry treatment plus a falls prevention leaflet (n = 517). Primary outcome: incidence of falls per participant in the 12 months following randomisation. Secondary outcomes: proportion of fallers and quality of life (EQ-5D-3L) which was converted into quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for each participant. Differences in mean costs and QALYs at 12 months were used to assess the cost-effectiveness of the intervention relative to usual care. Cost-effectiveness analyses were conducted in accordance with National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence reference case standards, using a regression-based approach with costs expressed in GBP (2015 price). The base case analysis used an intention-to-treat approach on the imputed data set using multiple imputation. Results: There was a small, non-statistically significant reduction in the incidence rate of falls in the intervention group (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.88, 95{\%} CI 0.73–1.05, p = 0.16). Participants allocated to the intervention group accumulated on average marginally higher QALYs than the usual care participants (mean difference 0.0129, 95{\%} CI –0.0050 to 0.0314). The intervention costs were on average GBP 252 more per participant compared to the usual care participants (95{\%} CI GBP –69 to GBP 589). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios ranged between GBP 19,494 and GBP 20,593 per QALY gained, below the conventional National Health Service cost-effectiveness thresholds of GBP 20,000 to GBP 30,000 per additional QALY. The probability that the podiatry intervention is cost-effective at a threshold of GBP 30,000 per QALY gained was 0.65. The results were robust to sensitivity analyses. Conclusion: The benefits of the intervention justified the moderate cost. The intervention could be a cost-effective option for falls prevention when compared with usual care in the UK.",
author = "{Corbacho Martin}, {Maria Belen} and Cockayne, {Elizabeth Sarah} and Fairhurst, {Caroline Marie} and Hicks, {Kathryn Jane} and Keenan, {Anne Maree} and Lamb, {Sarah E} and Menz, {Hylton B} and Redmond, {Anthony C} and Rodgers, {Sara Anita} and Scantlebury, {Arabella Louise} and Watson, {Judith M} and Torgerson, {David John} and Hewitt, {Catherine Elizabeth} and C. MacIntosh",
note = "{\circledC} 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel. This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details.",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "26",
doi = "10.1159/000489171",
language = "English",
journal = "Gerontology",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cost-Effectiveness of a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention for the Prevention of Falls in Older People

T2 - The REducing Falls with Orthoses and a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention Trial Findings

AU - Corbacho Martin, Maria Belen

AU - Cockayne, Elizabeth Sarah

AU - Fairhurst, Caroline Marie

AU - Hicks, Kathryn Jane

AU - Keenan, Anne Maree

AU - Lamb, Sarah E

AU - Menz, Hylton B

AU - Redmond, Anthony C

AU - Rodgers, Sara Anita

AU - Scantlebury, Arabella Louise

AU - Watson, Judith M

AU - Torgerson, David John

AU - Hewitt, Catherine Elizabeth

AU - MacIntosh, C.

N1 - © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel. This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details.

PY - 2018/6/26

Y1 - 2018/6/26

N2 - Background: Falls are a major cause of morbidity among older people. Multifaceted interventions may be effective in preventing falls and related fractures. Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness alongside the REducing Falls with Orthoses and a Multifaceted podiatry intervention (REFORM) trial. Methods: REFORM was a pragmatic multicentre cohort randomised controlled trial in England and Ireland; 1,010 participants (> 65 years) were randomised to receive either a podiatry intervention (n = 493), including foot and ankle strengthening exercises, foot orthoses, new footwear if required, and a falls prevention leaflet, or usual podiatry treatment plus a falls prevention leaflet (n = 517). Primary outcome: incidence of falls per participant in the 12 months following randomisation. Secondary outcomes: proportion of fallers and quality of life (EQ-5D-3L) which was converted into quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for each participant. Differences in mean costs and QALYs at 12 months were used to assess the cost-effectiveness of the intervention relative to usual care. Cost-effectiveness analyses were conducted in accordance with National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence reference case standards, using a regression-based approach with costs expressed in GBP (2015 price). The base case analysis used an intention-to-treat approach on the imputed data set using multiple imputation. Results: There was a small, non-statistically significant reduction in the incidence rate of falls in the intervention group (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.88, 95% CI 0.73–1.05, p = 0.16). Participants allocated to the intervention group accumulated on average marginally higher QALYs than the usual care participants (mean difference 0.0129, 95% CI –0.0050 to 0.0314). The intervention costs were on average GBP 252 more per participant compared to the usual care participants (95% CI GBP –69 to GBP 589). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios ranged between GBP 19,494 and GBP 20,593 per QALY gained, below the conventional National Health Service cost-effectiveness thresholds of GBP 20,000 to GBP 30,000 per additional QALY. The probability that the podiatry intervention is cost-effective at a threshold of GBP 30,000 per QALY gained was 0.65. The results were robust to sensitivity analyses. Conclusion: The benefits of the intervention justified the moderate cost. The intervention could be a cost-effective option for falls prevention when compared with usual care in the UK.

AB - Background: Falls are a major cause of morbidity among older people. Multifaceted interventions may be effective in preventing falls and related fractures. Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness alongside the REducing Falls with Orthoses and a Multifaceted podiatry intervention (REFORM) trial. Methods: REFORM was a pragmatic multicentre cohort randomised controlled trial in England and Ireland; 1,010 participants (> 65 years) were randomised to receive either a podiatry intervention (n = 493), including foot and ankle strengthening exercises, foot orthoses, new footwear if required, and a falls prevention leaflet, or usual podiatry treatment plus a falls prevention leaflet (n = 517). Primary outcome: incidence of falls per participant in the 12 months following randomisation. Secondary outcomes: proportion of fallers and quality of life (EQ-5D-3L) which was converted into quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for each participant. Differences in mean costs and QALYs at 12 months were used to assess the cost-effectiveness of the intervention relative to usual care. Cost-effectiveness analyses were conducted in accordance with National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence reference case standards, using a regression-based approach with costs expressed in GBP (2015 price). The base case analysis used an intention-to-treat approach on the imputed data set using multiple imputation. Results: There was a small, non-statistically significant reduction in the incidence rate of falls in the intervention group (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.88, 95% CI 0.73–1.05, p = 0.16). Participants allocated to the intervention group accumulated on average marginally higher QALYs than the usual care participants (mean difference 0.0129, 95% CI –0.0050 to 0.0314). The intervention costs were on average GBP 252 more per participant compared to the usual care participants (95% CI GBP –69 to GBP 589). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios ranged between GBP 19,494 and GBP 20,593 per QALY gained, below the conventional National Health Service cost-effectiveness thresholds of GBP 20,000 to GBP 30,000 per additional QALY. The probability that the podiatry intervention is cost-effective at a threshold of GBP 30,000 per QALY gained was 0.65. The results were robust to sensitivity analyses. Conclusion: The benefits of the intervention justified the moderate cost. The intervention could be a cost-effective option for falls prevention when compared with usual care in the UK.

U2 - 10.1159/000489171

DO - 10.1159/000489171

M3 - Article

JO - Gerontology

JF - Gerontology

ER -