By the same authors

Critical voices in management education

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Standard

Critical voices in management education. / Perriton, Linda; Singh, Amritesh.

Routledge Companion to the Humanities and Social Sciences in Management Education.. ed. / Timon Beyes; Martin Parker; Chris Steyaert. Routledge, 2015.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Harvard

Perriton, L & Singh, A 2015, Critical voices in management education. in T Beyes, M Parker & C Steyaert (eds), Routledge Companion to the Humanities and Social Sciences in Management Education.. Routledge.

APA

Perriton, L., & Singh, A. (Accepted/In press). Critical voices in management education. In T. Beyes, M. Parker, & C. Steyaert (Eds.), Routledge Companion to the Humanities and Social Sciences in Management Education. Routledge.

Vancouver

Perriton L, Singh A. Critical voices in management education. In Beyes T, Parker M, Steyaert C, editors, Routledge Companion to the Humanities and Social Sciences in Management Education.. Routledge. 2015

Author

Perriton, Linda ; Singh, Amritesh. / Critical voices in management education. Routledge Companion to the Humanities and Social Sciences in Management Education.. editor / Timon Beyes ; Martin Parker ; Chris Steyaert. Routledge, 2015.

Bibtex - Download

@inbook{a29a046dca134792bbbdafbfea8366d1,
title = "Critical voices in management education",
abstract = "This chapter looks back over the last thirty years of the critical management education (CME) project as expressed in the UK academic literature. The UK, with its much shorter experience of business schools and with a distinct social science bias, has enjoyed many more opportunities to pursue educational approaches that disrupt and destabilise the idea of management as a disinterested skill set – especially within post-graduate programmes. The recent funding changes in UK higher education and the reliance on business schools to generate fee income for the wider institution has started to bring the UK more into line with the US, with the UK educational literature suggesting that the scope for critical content and process is narrowing. The paper explores the critical management education responses to the marketised management education system, including the growing enthusiasm for arts and humanities/management hybrid modules.",
author = "Linda Perriton and Amritesh Singh",
year = "2015",
language = "English",
editor = "Timon Beyes and Martin Parker and Chris Steyaert",
booktitle = "Routledge Companion to the Humanities and Social Sciences in Management Education.",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - CHAP

T1 - Critical voices in management education

AU - Perriton, Linda

AU - Singh, Amritesh

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - This chapter looks back over the last thirty years of the critical management education (CME) project as expressed in the UK academic literature. The UK, with its much shorter experience of business schools and with a distinct social science bias, has enjoyed many more opportunities to pursue educational approaches that disrupt and destabilise the idea of management as a disinterested skill set – especially within post-graduate programmes. The recent funding changes in UK higher education and the reliance on business schools to generate fee income for the wider institution has started to bring the UK more into line with the US, with the UK educational literature suggesting that the scope for critical content and process is narrowing. The paper explores the critical management education responses to the marketised management education system, including the growing enthusiasm for arts and humanities/management hybrid modules.

AB - This chapter looks back over the last thirty years of the critical management education (CME) project as expressed in the UK academic literature. The UK, with its much shorter experience of business schools and with a distinct social science bias, has enjoyed many more opportunities to pursue educational approaches that disrupt and destabilise the idea of management as a disinterested skill set – especially within post-graduate programmes. The recent funding changes in UK higher education and the reliance on business schools to generate fee income for the wider institution has started to bring the UK more into line with the US, with the UK educational literature suggesting that the scope for critical content and process is narrowing. The paper explores the critical management education responses to the marketised management education system, including the growing enthusiasm for arts and humanities/management hybrid modules.

M3 - Chapter (peer-reviewed)

BT - Routledge Companion to the Humanities and Social Sciences in Management Education.

A2 - Beyes, Timon

A2 - Parker, Martin

A2 - Steyaert, Chris

PB - Routledge

ER -