By the same authors

From the same journal

From the same journal

Curbing Their Antagonism: Topics Associated with a Reduction in Personal Attacks at Prime Minister’s Questions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Curbing Their Antagonism: Topics Associated with a Reduction in Personal Attacks at Prime Minister’s Questions. / Waddle, Maurice; Bull, Peter.

In: Parliamentary Affairs, 30.03.2019, p. 1-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Waddle, M & Bull, P 2019, 'Curbing Their Antagonism: Topics Associated with a Reduction in Personal Attacks at Prime Minister’s Questions', Parliamentary Affairs, pp. 1-22. https://doi.org/10.1093/pa/gsz010

APA

Waddle, M., & Bull, P. (2019). Curbing Their Antagonism: Topics Associated with a Reduction in Personal Attacks at Prime Minister’s Questions. Parliamentary Affairs, 1-22. https://doi.org/10.1093/pa/gsz010

Vancouver

Waddle M, Bull P. Curbing Their Antagonism: Topics Associated with a Reduction in Personal Attacks at Prime Minister’s Questions. Parliamentary Affairs. 2019 Mar 30;1-22. https://doi.org/10.1093/pa/gsz010

Author

Waddle, Maurice ; Bull, Peter. / Curbing Their Antagonism: Topics Associated with a Reduction in Personal Attacks at Prime Minister’s Questions. In: Parliamentary Affairs. 2019 ; pp. 1-22.

Bibtex - Download

@article{9121d6efc0114fecab73e2e603feb18c,
title = "Curbing Their Antagonism:: Topics Associated with a Reduction in Personal Attacks at Prime Minister’s Questions",
abstract = "This study of leaders’ exchanges in Prime Minister’s Questions considers the potential for foreign policy debate to be associated with uncharacteristic personal respect between political opponents. Using an existing dataset coded for a specific form of verbal aggression—personal attacks—questions to the Prime Minister spanning a 37-year period were further analysed for policy topic. Compared to questions and responses focused on domestic policies, foreign policy exchanges were significantly lower in personal attacks. Discussion includes the possibility of this being a British example of the old US adage politics stops at the water’s edge. Credible theoretical explanations include intergroup theories, and one linked to another US political science phenomenon (the rally ‘round the flag effect), specifically, patriotism.",
author = "Maurice Waddle and Peter Bull",
note = "{\circledC} 2019 Oxford University Press. This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details.",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1093/pa/gsz010",
language = "English",
pages = "1--22",
journal = "Parliamentary Affairs",
issn = "0031-2290",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Curbing Their Antagonism:

T2 - Topics Associated with a Reduction in Personal Attacks at Prime Minister’s Questions

AU - Waddle, Maurice

AU - Bull, Peter

N1 - © 2019 Oxford University Press. This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details.

PY - 2019/3/30

Y1 - 2019/3/30

N2 - This study of leaders’ exchanges in Prime Minister’s Questions considers the potential for foreign policy debate to be associated with uncharacteristic personal respect between political opponents. Using an existing dataset coded for a specific form of verbal aggression—personal attacks—questions to the Prime Minister spanning a 37-year period were further analysed for policy topic. Compared to questions and responses focused on domestic policies, foreign policy exchanges were significantly lower in personal attacks. Discussion includes the possibility of this being a British example of the old US adage politics stops at the water’s edge. Credible theoretical explanations include intergroup theories, and one linked to another US political science phenomenon (the rally ‘round the flag effect), specifically, patriotism.

AB - This study of leaders’ exchanges in Prime Minister’s Questions considers the potential for foreign policy debate to be associated with uncharacteristic personal respect between political opponents. Using an existing dataset coded for a specific form of verbal aggression—personal attacks—questions to the Prime Minister spanning a 37-year period were further analysed for policy topic. Compared to questions and responses focused on domestic policies, foreign policy exchanges were significantly lower in personal attacks. Discussion includes the possibility of this being a British example of the old US adage politics stops at the water’s edge. Credible theoretical explanations include intergroup theories, and one linked to another US political science phenomenon (the rally ‘round the flag effect), specifically, patriotism.

U2 - 10.1093/pa/gsz010

DO - 10.1093/pa/gsz010

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 22

JO - Parliamentary Affairs

JF - Parliamentary Affairs

SN - 0031-2290

ER -