By the same authors

From the same journal

Dry Deposition of Ozone Over Land: Processes, Measurement, and Modeling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Dry Deposition of Ozone Over Land : Processes, Measurement, and Modeling. / Clifton, Olivia; Fiore, Arlene; Massman, W. J.; Baublitz, Colleen ; Coyle, M; Emberson, Lisa Dianne; Fares, Silvano .

In: Reviews of Geophysics, Vol. 58, No. 1, 11.03.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Clifton, O, Fiore, A, Massman, WJ, Baublitz, C, Coyle, M, Emberson, LD & Fares, S 2020, 'Dry Deposition of Ozone Over Land: Processes, Measurement, and Modeling', Reviews of Geophysics, vol. 58, no. 1. https://doi.org/10.1029/2019RG000670

APA

Clifton, O., Fiore, A., Massman, W. J., Baublitz, C., Coyle, M., Emberson, L. D., & Fares, S. (2020). Dry Deposition of Ozone Over Land: Processes, Measurement, and Modeling. Reviews of Geophysics, 58(1). https://doi.org/10.1029/2019RG000670

Vancouver

Clifton O, Fiore A, Massman WJ, Baublitz C, Coyle M, Emberson LD et al. Dry Deposition of Ozone Over Land: Processes, Measurement, and Modeling. Reviews of Geophysics. 2020 Mar 11;58(1). https://doi.org/10.1029/2019RG000670

Author

Clifton, Olivia ; Fiore, Arlene ; Massman, W. J. ; Baublitz, Colleen ; Coyle, M ; Emberson, Lisa Dianne ; Fares, Silvano . / Dry Deposition of Ozone Over Land : Processes, Measurement, and Modeling. In: Reviews of Geophysics. 2020 ; Vol. 58, No. 1.

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@article{20bacc2c1a8e4afebe221a4ac11e976c,
title = "Dry Deposition of Ozone Over Land: Processes, Measurement, and Modeling",
abstract = "Dry deposition of ozone is an important sink of ozone in near‐surface air. When dry deposition occurs through plant stomata, ozone can injure the plant, altering water and carbon cycling and reducing crop yields. Quantifying both stomatal and nonstomatal uptake accurately is relevant for understanding ozone's impact on human health as an air pollutant and on climate as a potent short‐lived greenhouse gas and primary control on the removal of several reactive greenhouse gases and air pollutants. Robust ozone dry deposition estimates require knowledge of the relative importance of individual deposition pathways, but spatiotemporal variability in nonstomatal deposition is poorly understood. Here we integrate understanding of ozone deposition processes by synthesizing research from fields such as atmospheric chemistry, ecology, and meteorology. We critically review methods for measurements and modeling, highlighting the empiricism that underpins modeling and thus the interpretation of observations. Our unprecedented synthesis of knowledge on deposition pathways, particularly soil and leaf cuticles, reveals process understanding not yet included in widely used models. If coordinated with short‐term field intensives, laboratory studies, and mechanistic modeling, measurements from a few long‐term sites would bridge the molecular to ecosystem scales necessary to establish the relative importance of individual deposition pathways and the extent to which they vary in space and time. Our recommended approaches seek to close knowledge gaps that currently limit quantifying the impact of ozone dry deposition on air quality, ecosystems, and climate.",
author = "Olivia Clifton and Arlene Fiore and Massman, {W. J.} and Colleen Baublitz and M Coyle and Emberson, {Lisa Dianne} and Silvano Fares",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2020 American Geophysical Union. This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher{\textquoteright}s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details.",
year = "2020",
month = mar,
day = "11",
doi = "10.1029/2019RG000670",
language = "English",
volume = "58",
journal = "Reviews of Geophysics",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dry Deposition of Ozone Over Land

T2 - Processes, Measurement, and Modeling

AU - Clifton, Olivia

AU - Fiore, Arlene

AU - Massman, W. J.

AU - Baublitz, Colleen

AU - Coyle, M

AU - Emberson, Lisa Dianne

AU - Fares, Silvano

N1 - © 2020 American Geophysical Union. This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details.

PY - 2020/3/11

Y1 - 2020/3/11

N2 - Dry deposition of ozone is an important sink of ozone in near‐surface air. When dry deposition occurs through plant stomata, ozone can injure the plant, altering water and carbon cycling and reducing crop yields. Quantifying both stomatal and nonstomatal uptake accurately is relevant for understanding ozone's impact on human health as an air pollutant and on climate as a potent short‐lived greenhouse gas and primary control on the removal of several reactive greenhouse gases and air pollutants. Robust ozone dry deposition estimates require knowledge of the relative importance of individual deposition pathways, but spatiotemporal variability in nonstomatal deposition is poorly understood. Here we integrate understanding of ozone deposition processes by synthesizing research from fields such as atmospheric chemistry, ecology, and meteorology. We critically review methods for measurements and modeling, highlighting the empiricism that underpins modeling and thus the interpretation of observations. Our unprecedented synthesis of knowledge on deposition pathways, particularly soil and leaf cuticles, reveals process understanding not yet included in widely used models. If coordinated with short‐term field intensives, laboratory studies, and mechanistic modeling, measurements from a few long‐term sites would bridge the molecular to ecosystem scales necessary to establish the relative importance of individual deposition pathways and the extent to which they vary in space and time. Our recommended approaches seek to close knowledge gaps that currently limit quantifying the impact of ozone dry deposition on air quality, ecosystems, and climate.

AB - Dry deposition of ozone is an important sink of ozone in near‐surface air. When dry deposition occurs through plant stomata, ozone can injure the plant, altering water and carbon cycling and reducing crop yields. Quantifying both stomatal and nonstomatal uptake accurately is relevant for understanding ozone's impact on human health as an air pollutant and on climate as a potent short‐lived greenhouse gas and primary control on the removal of several reactive greenhouse gases and air pollutants. Robust ozone dry deposition estimates require knowledge of the relative importance of individual deposition pathways, but spatiotemporal variability in nonstomatal deposition is poorly understood. Here we integrate understanding of ozone deposition processes by synthesizing research from fields such as atmospheric chemistry, ecology, and meteorology. We critically review methods for measurements and modeling, highlighting the empiricism that underpins modeling and thus the interpretation of observations. Our unprecedented synthesis of knowledge on deposition pathways, particularly soil and leaf cuticles, reveals process understanding not yet included in widely used models. If coordinated with short‐term field intensives, laboratory studies, and mechanistic modeling, measurements from a few long‐term sites would bridge the molecular to ecosystem scales necessary to establish the relative importance of individual deposition pathways and the extent to which they vary in space and time. Our recommended approaches seek to close knowledge gaps that currently limit quantifying the impact of ozone dry deposition on air quality, ecosystems, and climate.

U2 - 10.1029/2019RG000670

DO - 10.1029/2019RG000670

M3 - Article

VL - 58

JO - Reviews of Geophysics

JF - Reviews of Geophysics

IS - 1

ER -