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From the same journal

From the same journal

Early planned removal versus expectant management of peripherally inserted central catheters to prevent infection in newborn infants (Review)

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JournalCochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
DatePublished - 25 Jun 2018
Volume6
Number of pages15
Pages (from-to)CD012141
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Duration of use may be a modifiable risk factor for central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infection in newborn infants. Early planned removal of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) is recommended as a strategy to reduce the incidence of infection and its associated morbidity and mortality.

OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness of early planned removal of PICCs (up to two weeks after insertion) compared to an expectant approach or a longer fixed duration in preventing bloodstream infection and other complications in newborn infants.

SEARCH METHODS: We searched of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2018, Issue 4), Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, Maternity & Infant Care Database, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (until April 2018), and conference proceedings and previous reviews.

SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials that assessed the effect of early planned removal of umbilical venous catheters (up to two weeks after insertion) compared to an expectant management approach or a longer fixed duration in preventing bloodstream infection and other complications in newborn infants.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors assessed trial eligibility independently. We planned to analyse any treatment effects in the individual trials and report the risk ratio and risk difference for dichotomous data and mean difference for continuous data, with respective 95% confidence intervals. We planned to use a fixed-effect model in meta-analyses and explore potential causes of heterogeneity in sensitivity analyses. We planned to assess the quality of evidence for the main comparison at the outcome level using "Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation" (GRADE) methods.

MAIN RESULTS: We did not identify any eligible randomised controlled trials.

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There are no trial data to guide practice regarding early planned removal versus expectant management of PICCs in newborn infants. A simple and pragmatic randomised controlled trial is needed to resolve the uncertainty about optimal management in this common and important clinical dilemma.

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© 2018 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details

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  • Journal Article, Review

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