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Ecological consequences of colony structure in dynamic ant nest networks

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Ecological consequences of colony structure in dynamic ant nest networks. / Ellis, Samuel; Franks, Daniel Wayne; Robinson, Elva Joan Hilda.

In: Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 7, 24.01.2017, p. 1170–1180 .

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Ellis, S, Franks, DW & Robinson, EJH 2017, 'Ecological consequences of colony structure in dynamic ant nest networks', Ecology and Evolution, vol. 7, pp. 1170–1180 . https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2749

APA

Ellis, S., Franks, D. W., & Robinson, E. J. H. (2017). Ecological consequences of colony structure in dynamic ant nest networks. Ecology and Evolution, 7, 1170–1180 . https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2749

Vancouver

Ellis S, Franks DW, Robinson EJH. Ecological consequences of colony structure in dynamic ant nest networks. Ecology and Evolution. 2017 Jan 24;7:1170–1180 . https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2749

Author

Ellis, Samuel ; Franks, Daniel Wayne ; Robinson, Elva Joan Hilda. / Ecological consequences of colony structure in dynamic ant nest networks. In: Ecology and Evolution. 2017 ; Vol. 7. pp. 1170–1180 .

Bibtex - Download

@article{de940e2a81dc497c94afc46a9a5661eb,
title = "Ecological consequences of colony structure in dynamic ant nest networks",
abstract = "Access to resources depends on an individual{\textquoteright}s position within theenvironment. This is particularly important to animals that invest heavily innest construction, such as social insects. Many ant species have apolydomous nesting strategy: a single colony inhabits several spatiallyseparated nests, often exchanging resources between the nests. Differentnests in a polydomous colony potentially have differential access toresources, but the ecological consequences of this are unclear. In thisstudy, we investigate how nest survival and budding in polydomous woodant (Formica lugubris) colonies are affected by being part of a multi-nestsystem. Using field data and novel analytical approaches combiningsurvival models with dynamic network analysis, we show that the survivaland budding of nests within a polydomous colony is affected by theirposition in the nest-network structure. Specifically, we find that the flow ofresources through a nest, which is based on its position within the widernest-network, determines a nest{\textquoteright}s likelihood of surviving, and of foundingnew nests. Our results highlight how apparently disparate entities in abiological system can be integrated into a functional ecological unit. Wealso demonstrate how position within a dynamic network structure canhave important ecological consequences.",
keywords = "polydomy, social organisation, networks, biological networks, foraging, cooperation, dynamic networks, survival analysis, ants, wood ants, social insects, transport networks, social networks",
author = "Samuel Ellis and Franks, {Daniel Wayne} and Robinson, {Elva Joan Hilda}",
year = "2017",
month = jan,
day = "24",
doi = "10.1002/ece3.2749",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "1170–1180 ",
journal = "Ecology and Evolution",
issn = "2045-7758",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ecological consequences of colony structure in dynamic ant nest networks

AU - Ellis, Samuel

AU - Franks, Daniel Wayne

AU - Robinson, Elva Joan Hilda

PY - 2017/1/24

Y1 - 2017/1/24

N2 - Access to resources depends on an individual’s position within theenvironment. This is particularly important to animals that invest heavily innest construction, such as social insects. Many ant species have apolydomous nesting strategy: a single colony inhabits several spatiallyseparated nests, often exchanging resources between the nests. Differentnests in a polydomous colony potentially have differential access toresources, but the ecological consequences of this are unclear. In thisstudy, we investigate how nest survival and budding in polydomous woodant (Formica lugubris) colonies are affected by being part of a multi-nestsystem. Using field data and novel analytical approaches combiningsurvival models with dynamic network analysis, we show that the survivaland budding of nests within a polydomous colony is affected by theirposition in the nest-network structure. Specifically, we find that the flow ofresources through a nest, which is based on its position within the widernest-network, determines a nest’s likelihood of surviving, and of foundingnew nests. Our results highlight how apparently disparate entities in abiological system can be integrated into a functional ecological unit. Wealso demonstrate how position within a dynamic network structure canhave important ecological consequences.

AB - Access to resources depends on an individual’s position within theenvironment. This is particularly important to animals that invest heavily innest construction, such as social insects. Many ant species have apolydomous nesting strategy: a single colony inhabits several spatiallyseparated nests, often exchanging resources between the nests. Differentnests in a polydomous colony potentially have differential access toresources, but the ecological consequences of this are unclear. In thisstudy, we investigate how nest survival and budding in polydomous woodant (Formica lugubris) colonies are affected by being part of a multi-nestsystem. Using field data and novel analytical approaches combiningsurvival models with dynamic network analysis, we show that the survivaland budding of nests within a polydomous colony is affected by theirposition in the nest-network structure. Specifically, we find that the flow ofresources through a nest, which is based on its position within the widernest-network, determines a nest’s likelihood of surviving, and of foundingnew nests. Our results highlight how apparently disparate entities in abiological system can be integrated into a functional ecological unit. Wealso demonstrate how position within a dynamic network structure canhave important ecological consequences.

KW - polydomy

KW - social organisation

KW - networks

KW - biological networks

KW - foraging

KW - cooperation

KW - dynamic networks

KW - survival analysis

KW - ants

KW - wood ants

KW - social insects

KW - transport networks

KW - social networks

U2 - 10.1002/ece3.2749

DO - 10.1002/ece3.2749

M3 - Article

VL - 7

SP - 1170

EP - 1180

JO - Ecology and Evolution

JF - Ecology and Evolution

SN - 2045-7758

ER -