By the same authors

From the same journal

From the same journal

Environmental interventions to reduce fear of crime: systematic review of effectiveness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Environmental interventions to reduce fear of crime : systematic review of effectiveness. / Lorenc, Theo; Petticrew, Mark; Whitehead, Margaret; Neary, David; Clayton, Stephen; Wright, Kath; Thomson, Hilary; Cummins, Steven; Sowden, Amanda; Renton, Adrian.

In: Systematic Reviews, Vol. 2, No. 30, 12.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Lorenc, T, Petticrew, M, Whitehead, M, Neary, D, Clayton, S, Wright, K, Thomson, H, Cummins, S, Sowden, A & Renton, A 2013, 'Environmental interventions to reduce fear of crime: systematic review of effectiveness', Systematic Reviews, vol. 2, no. 30. https://doi.org/10.1186/2046-4053-2-30

APA

Lorenc, T., Petticrew, M., Whitehead, M., Neary, D., Clayton, S., Wright, K., ... Renton, A. (2013). Environmental interventions to reduce fear of crime: systematic review of effectiveness. Systematic Reviews, 2(30). https://doi.org/10.1186/2046-4053-2-30

Vancouver

Lorenc T, Petticrew M, Whitehead M, Neary D, Clayton S, Wright K et al. Environmental interventions to reduce fear of crime: systematic review of effectiveness. Systematic Reviews. 2013 Dec;2(30). https://doi.org/10.1186/2046-4053-2-30

Author

Lorenc, Theo ; Petticrew, Mark ; Whitehead, Margaret ; Neary, David ; Clayton, Stephen ; Wright, Kath ; Thomson, Hilary ; Cummins, Steven ; Sowden, Amanda ; Renton, Adrian. / Environmental interventions to reduce fear of crime : systematic review of effectiveness. In: Systematic Reviews. 2013 ; Vol. 2, No. 30.

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@article{6075fed6991e422b90de1ad6f5ea583e,
title = "Environmental interventions to reduce fear of crime: systematic review of effectiveness",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Fear of crime is associated with negative health and wellbeing outcomes, and may mediate some impacts of the built environment on public health. A range of environmental interventions have been hypothesized to reduce the fear of crime. METHODS: This review aimed to synthesize the literature on the effectiveness of interventions in the built environment to reduce the fear of crime. Systematic review methodology, following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidance, was used. Studies of environmental interventions which reported a fear of crime outcome and used any prospective evaluation design (randomized controlled trial (RCT), trial or uncontrolled before-and-after study) were included. Eighteen databases were searched. The Hamilton tool was used to assess quality. A narrative synthesis of findings was undertaken. RESULTS: A total of 47 studies were included, 22 controlled and 25 uncontrolled, with total sample sizes ranging from n = 52 to approximately n = 23,000. Thirty-six studies were conducted in the UK, ten studies in the USA and one study in the Netherlands. The quality of the evidence overall is low. There are some indications that home security improvements and non-crime-related environmental improvements may be effective for some fear of crime outcomes. There is little evidence that the following reduce fear of crime: street lighting improvements, closed-circuit television (CCTV), multi-component environmental crime prevention programs or regeneration programs. CONCLUSIONS: There is some evidence for the effectiveness of specific environmental interventions in reducing some indicators of fear of crime, but more attention on the context and possible confounders is needed in future evaluations of complex social interventions such as these.",
author = "Theo Lorenc and Mark Petticrew and Margaret Whitehead and David Neary and Stephen Clayton and Kath Wright and Hilary Thomson and Steven Cummins and Amanda Sowden and Adrian Renton",
year = "2013",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1186/2046-4053-2-30",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
journal = "Systematic Reviews",
issn = "2046-4053",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "30",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Environmental interventions to reduce fear of crime

T2 - systematic review of effectiveness

AU - Lorenc, Theo

AU - Petticrew, Mark

AU - Whitehead, Margaret

AU - Neary, David

AU - Clayton, Stephen

AU - Wright, Kath

AU - Thomson, Hilary

AU - Cummins, Steven

AU - Sowden, Amanda

AU - Renton, Adrian

PY - 2013/12

Y1 - 2013/12

N2 - BACKGROUND: Fear of crime is associated with negative health and wellbeing outcomes, and may mediate some impacts of the built environment on public health. A range of environmental interventions have been hypothesized to reduce the fear of crime. METHODS: This review aimed to synthesize the literature on the effectiveness of interventions in the built environment to reduce the fear of crime. Systematic review methodology, following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidance, was used. Studies of environmental interventions which reported a fear of crime outcome and used any prospective evaluation design (randomized controlled trial (RCT), trial or uncontrolled before-and-after study) were included. Eighteen databases were searched. The Hamilton tool was used to assess quality. A narrative synthesis of findings was undertaken. RESULTS: A total of 47 studies were included, 22 controlled and 25 uncontrolled, with total sample sizes ranging from n = 52 to approximately n = 23,000. Thirty-six studies were conducted in the UK, ten studies in the USA and one study in the Netherlands. The quality of the evidence overall is low. There are some indications that home security improvements and non-crime-related environmental improvements may be effective for some fear of crime outcomes. There is little evidence that the following reduce fear of crime: street lighting improvements, closed-circuit television (CCTV), multi-component environmental crime prevention programs or regeneration programs. CONCLUSIONS: There is some evidence for the effectiveness of specific environmental interventions in reducing some indicators of fear of crime, but more attention on the context and possible confounders is needed in future evaluations of complex social interventions such as these.

AB - BACKGROUND: Fear of crime is associated with negative health and wellbeing outcomes, and may mediate some impacts of the built environment on public health. A range of environmental interventions have been hypothesized to reduce the fear of crime. METHODS: This review aimed to synthesize the literature on the effectiveness of interventions in the built environment to reduce the fear of crime. Systematic review methodology, following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidance, was used. Studies of environmental interventions which reported a fear of crime outcome and used any prospective evaluation design (randomized controlled trial (RCT), trial or uncontrolled before-and-after study) were included. Eighteen databases were searched. The Hamilton tool was used to assess quality. A narrative synthesis of findings was undertaken. RESULTS: A total of 47 studies were included, 22 controlled and 25 uncontrolled, with total sample sizes ranging from n = 52 to approximately n = 23,000. Thirty-six studies were conducted in the UK, ten studies in the USA and one study in the Netherlands. The quality of the evidence overall is low. There are some indications that home security improvements and non-crime-related environmental improvements may be effective for some fear of crime outcomes. There is little evidence that the following reduce fear of crime: street lighting improvements, closed-circuit television (CCTV), multi-component environmental crime prevention programs or regeneration programs. CONCLUSIONS: There is some evidence for the effectiveness of specific environmental interventions in reducing some indicators of fear of crime, but more attention on the context and possible confounders is needed in future evaluations of complex social interventions such as these.

U2 - 10.1186/2046-4053-2-30

DO - 10.1186/2046-4053-2-30

M3 - Article

VL - 2

JO - Systematic Reviews

JF - Systematic Reviews

SN - 2046-4053

IS - 30

ER -