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Ethno-Specific Risk Factors for Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: Findings from the Born in Bradford Cohort Study

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JournalMaternal and child health journal
DatePublished - 16 Mar 2016
Number of pages11
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Objectives Preterm birth (PTB) and small for gestational age (SGA) are major causes of perinatal mortality and morbidity. Previous studies indicated a range of risk factors associated with these poor outcomes, including maternal psychosocial and economic wellbeing. This paper will explore a range of psycho-social and economic factors in an ethnically diverse population. Methods The UK's Born in Bradford cohort study recruited pregnant women attending a routine antenatal appointment at 26-28 weeks' gestation at the Bradford Royal Infirmary (2007-2010). This analysis includes 9680 women with singleton live births who completed the baseline questionnaire. Data regarding maternal socio-demographic and mental health were recorded. Outcome data were collected prospectively, and analysed using multivariate regression models. The primary outcomes measured were: PTB (<37 weeks' gestation) and SGA (<10th customised centile). Results After adjustment for socio-demographic and medical factors, financial strain was associated with a 45 % increase in PTB (OR 1.45: 95 % CI 1.06-1.98). Contrary to expectation, maternal distress in Pakistani women was negatively associated with SGA (OR 0.65: CI 0.48-0.88). Obesity in White British women was protective for PTB (OR 0.67: CI 0.45-0.98). Previously recognized risk factors, such as smoking in pregnancy and hypertension, were confirmed. Conclusions This study confirms known risk factors for PTB and SGA, along with a new variable of interest, financial strain. It also reveals a difference in the risk factors between ethnicities. In order to develop appropriate targeted preventative strategies to improve perinatal outcome in disadvantaged groups, a greater understanding of ethno-specific risk factors is required.

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