By the same authors

From the same journal

From Transitional to Transformative Justice: A New Agenda for Practice

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From Transitional to Transformative Justice : A New Agenda for Practice. / Gready, Paul; Robins, Simon.

In: International Journal of Transitional Justice, Vol. 8, No. 3, 11.2014, p. 339-361.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Gready, P & Robins, S 2014, 'From Transitional to Transformative Justice: A New Agenda for Practice', International Journal of Transitional Justice, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 339-361. https://doi.org/10.1093/ijtj/iju013

APA

Gready, P., & Robins, S. (2014). From Transitional to Transformative Justice: A New Agenda for Practice. International Journal of Transitional Justice, 8(3), 339-361. https://doi.org/10.1093/ijtj/iju013

Vancouver

Gready P, Robins S. From Transitional to Transformative Justice: A New Agenda for Practice. International Journal of Transitional Justice. 2014 Nov;8(3):339-361. https://doi.org/10.1093/ijtj/iju013

Author

Gready, Paul ; Robins, Simon. / From Transitional to Transformative Justice : A New Agenda for Practice. In: International Journal of Transitional Justice. 2014 ; Vol. 8, No. 3. pp. 339-361.

Bibtex - Download

@article{873c58b5266a47c68592c0a4a1018806,
title = "From Transitional to Transformative Justice: A New Agenda for Practice",
abstract = "Transitional justice has become a globally dominant lens through which to approach states addressing legacies of a violent past. An industry of praxis has emerged, supported by dedicated NGOs and large-scale funding from Western donors. Yet, the performance and impact of transitional justice mechanisms has been at best ambiguous and at times disappointing. This article proposes a new agenda for practice, one that offers a concept of justice that is more ‘transformative’ than ‘transitional’. The article starts by setting out the limitations of transitional justice, and recent responses to these limitations in transitional justice practice. A distinction is made between foundational and secondary limitations. The former – the liberal peace and top-down, state-based approaches – remain largely unchallenged and condition the way in which practice evolves and responds to criticisms e.g. attempts to adopt more ‘holistic’ approaches or address socio-economic rights, As such, reforms encounter secondary limitations and fall short of transformative justice. A definition of transformative justice draws on this discussion as well as insights from related fields such as peacebuilding and conflict transformation - transformative justice is defined as transformative change that emphasises local agency and resources, the prioritization of process rather than pre-conceived outcomes, and the challenging of unequal and intersecting power relationships and structures of exclusion at both local and global levels. A final section of the article, on tools for transformative justice, provides practical guidance on how to implement a more transformative transitional justice.",
keywords = "structural violence, empowerment, participation, human rights, transformative justice",
author = "Paul Gready and Simon Robins",
year = "2014",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1093/ijtj/iju013",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "339--361",
journal = "International Journal of Transitional Justice",
issn = "1752-7716",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - From Transitional to Transformative Justice

T2 - A New Agenda for Practice

AU - Gready, Paul

AU - Robins, Simon

PY - 2014/11

Y1 - 2014/11

N2 - Transitional justice has become a globally dominant lens through which to approach states addressing legacies of a violent past. An industry of praxis has emerged, supported by dedicated NGOs and large-scale funding from Western donors. Yet, the performance and impact of transitional justice mechanisms has been at best ambiguous and at times disappointing. This article proposes a new agenda for practice, one that offers a concept of justice that is more ‘transformative’ than ‘transitional’. The article starts by setting out the limitations of transitional justice, and recent responses to these limitations in transitional justice practice. A distinction is made between foundational and secondary limitations. The former – the liberal peace and top-down, state-based approaches – remain largely unchallenged and condition the way in which practice evolves and responds to criticisms e.g. attempts to adopt more ‘holistic’ approaches or address socio-economic rights, As such, reforms encounter secondary limitations and fall short of transformative justice. A definition of transformative justice draws on this discussion as well as insights from related fields such as peacebuilding and conflict transformation - transformative justice is defined as transformative change that emphasises local agency and resources, the prioritization of process rather than pre-conceived outcomes, and the challenging of unequal and intersecting power relationships and structures of exclusion at both local and global levels. A final section of the article, on tools for transformative justice, provides practical guidance on how to implement a more transformative transitional justice.

AB - Transitional justice has become a globally dominant lens through which to approach states addressing legacies of a violent past. An industry of praxis has emerged, supported by dedicated NGOs and large-scale funding from Western donors. Yet, the performance and impact of transitional justice mechanisms has been at best ambiguous and at times disappointing. This article proposes a new agenda for practice, one that offers a concept of justice that is more ‘transformative’ than ‘transitional’. The article starts by setting out the limitations of transitional justice, and recent responses to these limitations in transitional justice practice. A distinction is made between foundational and secondary limitations. The former – the liberal peace and top-down, state-based approaches – remain largely unchallenged and condition the way in which practice evolves and responds to criticisms e.g. attempts to adopt more ‘holistic’ approaches or address socio-economic rights, As such, reforms encounter secondary limitations and fall short of transformative justice. A definition of transformative justice draws on this discussion as well as insights from related fields such as peacebuilding and conflict transformation - transformative justice is defined as transformative change that emphasises local agency and resources, the prioritization of process rather than pre-conceived outcomes, and the challenging of unequal and intersecting power relationships and structures of exclusion at both local and global levels. A final section of the article, on tools for transformative justice, provides practical guidance on how to implement a more transformative transitional justice.

KW - structural violence

KW - empowerment

KW - participation

KW - human rights

KW - transformative justice

U2 - 10.1093/ijtj/iju013

DO - 10.1093/ijtj/iju013

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 339

EP - 361

JO - International Journal of Transitional Justice

JF - International Journal of Transitional Justice

SN - 1752-7716

IS - 3

ER -