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Gelation: The Role of Sugars and Polyols on Gelatin and Agarose

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Gelation : The Role of Sugars and Polyols on Gelatin and Agarose. / Shimizu, Seishi; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, Vol. 118, No. 46, 20.11.2014, p. 13210-13216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Shimizu, S & Matubayasi, N 2014, 'Gelation: The Role of Sugars and Polyols on Gelatin and Agarose', Journal of Physical Chemistry B, vol. 118, no. 46, pp. 13210-13216. https://doi.org/10.1021/jp509099h

APA

Shimizu, S., & Matubayasi, N. (2014). Gelation: The Role of Sugars and Polyols on Gelatin and Agarose. Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 118(46), 13210-13216. https://doi.org/10.1021/jp509099h

Vancouver

Shimizu S, Matubayasi N. Gelation: The Role of Sugars and Polyols on Gelatin and Agarose. Journal of Physical Chemistry B. 2014 Nov 20;118(46):13210-13216. https://doi.org/10.1021/jp509099h

Author

Shimizu, Seishi ; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki. / Gelation : The Role of Sugars and Polyols on Gelatin and Agarose. In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B. 2014 ; Vol. 118, No. 46. pp. 13210-13216.

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@article{cac392f0e0954462be6c14ebdbdfd5af,
title = "Gelation: The Role of Sugars and Polyols on Gelatin and Agarose",
abstract = "Gelation is enhanced by the addition of sugars and polyols. How, at a microscopic level, do such cosolvents enhance gelation? The following two different hypotheses have been proposed so far to answer this question: (i) enhancement of water structure around the biopolymer induced by cosolvents; (ii) exclusion of cosolvents from biopolymer surfaces. To examine the validity of the above hypotheses, as well as to quantify the driving forces of cosolvent-induced gelation, we have constructed a statistical thermodynamic theory of gelation, by extending our Kirkwood-Buff theory of cosolvency; biopolymer-water and biopolymer-cosolvent interactions can both be determined from thermodynamic data. The exclusion of cosolvents is shown to be the dominant contribution, whereas the hydration change is a minor contribution, which may be important only so far as to mediate the exclusion of cosolvents.",
author = "Seishi Shimizu and Nobuyuki Matubayasi",
year = "2014",
month = "11",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1021/jp509099h",
language = "English",
volume = "118",
pages = "13210--13216",
journal = "Journal of Physical Chemistry B",
issn = "1520-6106",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "46",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gelation

T2 - Journal of Physical Chemistry B

AU - Shimizu, Seishi

AU - Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

PY - 2014/11/20

Y1 - 2014/11/20

N2 - Gelation is enhanced by the addition of sugars and polyols. How, at a microscopic level, do such cosolvents enhance gelation? The following two different hypotheses have been proposed so far to answer this question: (i) enhancement of water structure around the biopolymer induced by cosolvents; (ii) exclusion of cosolvents from biopolymer surfaces. To examine the validity of the above hypotheses, as well as to quantify the driving forces of cosolvent-induced gelation, we have constructed a statistical thermodynamic theory of gelation, by extending our Kirkwood-Buff theory of cosolvency; biopolymer-water and biopolymer-cosolvent interactions can both be determined from thermodynamic data. The exclusion of cosolvents is shown to be the dominant contribution, whereas the hydration change is a minor contribution, which may be important only so far as to mediate the exclusion of cosolvents.

AB - Gelation is enhanced by the addition of sugars and polyols. How, at a microscopic level, do such cosolvents enhance gelation? The following two different hypotheses have been proposed so far to answer this question: (i) enhancement of water structure around the biopolymer induced by cosolvents; (ii) exclusion of cosolvents from biopolymer surfaces. To examine the validity of the above hypotheses, as well as to quantify the driving forces of cosolvent-induced gelation, we have constructed a statistical thermodynamic theory of gelation, by extending our Kirkwood-Buff theory of cosolvency; biopolymer-water and biopolymer-cosolvent interactions can both be determined from thermodynamic data. The exclusion of cosolvents is shown to be the dominant contribution, whereas the hydration change is a minor contribution, which may be important only so far as to mediate the exclusion of cosolvents.

U2 - 10.1021/jp509099h

DO - 10.1021/jp509099h

M3 - Article

VL - 118

SP - 13210

EP - 13216

JO - Journal of Physical Chemistry B

JF - Journal of Physical Chemistry B

SN - 1520-6106

IS - 46

ER -