Happiness, self-esteem, and prosociality in children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder: evidence from a UK population cohort study

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Happiness, self-esteem, and prosociality in children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder : evidence from a UK population cohort study. / McChesney, Gillian ; Toseeb, Umar.

In: Autism Research, 06.07.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

McChesney, G & Toseeb, U 2018, 'Happiness, self-esteem, and prosociality in children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder: evidence from a UK population cohort study', Autism Research. https://doi.org/10.1002/aur.1957

APA

McChesney, G., & Toseeb, U. (2018). Happiness, self-esteem, and prosociality in children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder: evidence from a UK population cohort study. Autism Research. https://doi.org/10.1002/aur.1957

Vancouver

McChesney G, Toseeb U. Happiness, self-esteem, and prosociality in children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder: evidence from a UK population cohort study. Autism Research. 2018 Jul 6. https://doi.org/10.1002/aur.1957

Author

McChesney, Gillian ; Toseeb, Umar. / Happiness, self-esteem, and prosociality in children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder : evidence from a UK population cohort study. In: Autism Research. 2018.

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@article{9a60b669030040e4bd5db72eaf07f39b,
title = "Happiness, self-esteem, and prosociality in children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder: evidence from a UK population cohort study",
abstract = "High levels of childhood happiness, self-esteem, and prosociality are associated with positive social and emotional outcomes. Little is known about whether these constructs co-occur and how levels of co-occurrence are different in children with/without Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Data was obtained from 13,285 11-year olds (408 with ASD) from a UK based prospective cohort study. Latent class analysis revealed five distinct classes: The “very low prosociality class” (with ASD 32{\%} vs without ASD 7{\%}) was characterised by children who were happy and had high self-esteem but they were not prosocial. The “low happiness class” (with ASD 3{\%} vs without ASD 3{\%}), included those children who had moderate self-esteem and were prosocial but were the least happy. Children in the “low to moderate positive functioning class” (with ASD 16{\%} vs without ASD 6{\%}) were moderately happy and had the lowest self-esteem but they were prosocial. The “moderate to high positive functioning class” (with ASD 17{\%} vs without ASD 23{\%}) was characterised by children who were happy, had moderate self-esteem, and were very prosocial. The majority of children were in the “optimum class” (with ASD 31{\%} vs without ASD 62{\%}), and were very happy, very prosocial with high self-esteem. Our findings demonstrate that for the majority of children in our sample, happiness, self-esteem, and prosociality co-occur. Furthermore, although, as a group, children with ASD have lower levels of positive functioning, our multivariable latent class approach suggests that nearly half of children with ASD are happy, have good levels self-esteem, and are prosocial.",
keywords = "Autism spectrum disorder, happiness, prosociality, self-esteem",
author = "Gillian McChesney and Umar Toseeb",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1002/aur.1957",
language = "English",
journal = "Autism Research",
issn = "1939-3806",
publisher = "Wiley",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Happiness, self-esteem, and prosociality in children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder

T2 - Autism Research

AU - McChesney, Gillian

AU - Toseeb, Umar

PY - 2018/7/6

Y1 - 2018/7/6

N2 - High levels of childhood happiness, self-esteem, and prosociality are associated with positive social and emotional outcomes. Little is known about whether these constructs co-occur and how levels of co-occurrence are different in children with/without Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Data was obtained from 13,285 11-year olds (408 with ASD) from a UK based prospective cohort study. Latent class analysis revealed five distinct classes: The “very low prosociality class” (with ASD 32% vs without ASD 7%) was characterised by children who were happy and had high self-esteem but they were not prosocial. The “low happiness class” (with ASD 3% vs without ASD 3%), included those children who had moderate self-esteem and were prosocial but were the least happy. Children in the “low to moderate positive functioning class” (with ASD 16% vs without ASD 6%) were moderately happy and had the lowest self-esteem but they were prosocial. The “moderate to high positive functioning class” (with ASD 17% vs without ASD 23%) was characterised by children who were happy, had moderate self-esteem, and were very prosocial. The majority of children were in the “optimum class” (with ASD 31% vs without ASD 62%), and were very happy, very prosocial with high self-esteem. Our findings demonstrate that for the majority of children in our sample, happiness, self-esteem, and prosociality co-occur. Furthermore, although, as a group, children with ASD have lower levels of positive functioning, our multivariable latent class approach suggests that nearly half of children with ASD are happy, have good levels self-esteem, and are prosocial.

AB - High levels of childhood happiness, self-esteem, and prosociality are associated with positive social and emotional outcomes. Little is known about whether these constructs co-occur and how levels of co-occurrence are different in children with/without Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Data was obtained from 13,285 11-year olds (408 with ASD) from a UK based prospective cohort study. Latent class analysis revealed five distinct classes: The “very low prosociality class” (with ASD 32% vs without ASD 7%) was characterised by children who were happy and had high self-esteem but they were not prosocial. The “low happiness class” (with ASD 3% vs without ASD 3%), included those children who had moderate self-esteem and were prosocial but were the least happy. Children in the “low to moderate positive functioning class” (with ASD 16% vs without ASD 6%) were moderately happy and had the lowest self-esteem but they were prosocial. The “moderate to high positive functioning class” (with ASD 17% vs without ASD 23%) was characterised by children who were happy, had moderate self-esteem, and were very prosocial. The majority of children were in the “optimum class” (with ASD 31% vs without ASD 62%), and were very happy, very prosocial with high self-esteem. Our findings demonstrate that for the majority of children in our sample, happiness, self-esteem, and prosociality co-occur. Furthermore, although, as a group, children with ASD have lower levels of positive functioning, our multivariable latent class approach suggests that nearly half of children with ASD are happy, have good levels self-esteem, and are prosocial.

KW - Autism spectrum disorder

KW - happiness

KW - prosociality

KW - self-esteem

U2 - 10.1002/aur.1957

DO - 10.1002/aur.1957

M3 - Article

JO - Autism Research

JF - Autism Research

SN - 1939-3806

ER -