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Hodgkin's lymphoma and infection: findings from a UK case-control study

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JournalBritish journal of cancer
DatePublished - 30 Oct 2007
Issue number9
Volume97
Number of pages5
Pages (from-to)1310-1314
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Between 1998 and 2003, 214 people with Hodgkin's lymphoma and 214 controls randomly selected from population registers in the north of England (after matching for age and sex) were recruited and their primary care medical records examined for details of clinical diagnoses due to infectious and non-infectious conditions in the preceding 15 years. In the year before diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma, almost all cases (99%) visited their general practitioner (GP) at least once. In comparison with controls, the excess was evident both for visits with an infection (odd's ratio (OR)=2.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-3.2) and for visits with noninfectious problems (OR=17.2; 95% CI 6.7-43.9). During the rest of the 15-year period prior to diagnosis, the proportion of people visiting their GP with a non-infectious condition did not differ between cases and controls. In contrast, compared to controls, there was an excess of cases visiting the GP with an infection, a finding that was evident for at least a decade prior to diagnosis and increased linearly with time (P=0.02). This excess was not due to a specific infection(s) and may reflect underlying immune abnormality. Alternatively, infection may cause B-cell proliferation from which a malignant clone may evolve.

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© 2007 Cancer Research UK. This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details

    Research areas

  • Hodgkin's, lymphoma, infection, B-CELL LYMPHOMA, EPSTEIN-BARR-VIRUS, COMPOSITE LYMPHOMA, UNITED-KINGDOM, DISEASE, CANCER, RISK, TRANSPLANTATION, MONONUCLEOSIS, DIAGNOSIS

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