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From the same journal

Home country advantage? The influence of Italian, German and Austrian employee representatives in the UniCredit European Works Council

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Home country advantage? The influence of Italian, German and Austrian employee representatives in the UniCredit European Works Council. / Cavallini, Michela; Gold, Michael ; Royle, Anthony; Senatori, Iacopo.

In: European journal of industrial relations, Vol. 22, No. 2, 01.06.2016, p. 115 - 130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Cavallini, M, Gold, M, Royle, A & Senatori, I 2016, 'Home country advantage? The influence of Italian, German and Austrian employee representatives in the UniCredit European Works Council', European journal of industrial relations, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 115 - 130. https://doi.org/10.1177/0959680115602357

APA

Cavallini, M., Gold, M., Royle, A., & Senatori, I. (2016). Home country advantage? The influence of Italian, German and Austrian employee representatives in the UniCredit European Works Council. European journal of industrial relations, 22(2), 115 - 130. https://doi.org/10.1177/0959680115602357

Vancouver

Cavallini M, Gold M, Royle A, Senatori I. Home country advantage? The influence of Italian, German and Austrian employee representatives in the UniCredit European Works Council. European journal of industrial relations. 2016 Jun 1;22(2):115 - 130. https://doi.org/10.1177/0959680115602357

Author

Cavallini, Michela ; Gold, Michael ; Royle, Anthony ; Senatori, Iacopo. / Home country advantage? The influence of Italian, German and Austrian employee representatives in the UniCredit European Works Council. In: European journal of industrial relations. 2016 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 115 - 130.

Bibtex - Download

@article{b6a2dfa3247e419e8d35345be2592fd9,
title = "Home country advantage? The influence of Italian, German and Austrian employee representatives in the UniCredit European Works Council",
abstract = "This article examines the first European Works Council (EWC) to be established in the Italian banking sector, at UniCredit. It focuses on the interaction between Italian, German and Austrian delegations of employee representatives and on the perspectives and practices that reflect their different cultural and institutional backgrounds in industrial relations. Much of the literature suggests that employee representatives from the home country of a multinational company are likely to mould EWC structures in accordance with their own national backgrounds and have greater confidence in dealing with central management in EWC meetings. Our findings partly substantiate this argument, but also suggest that minority delegations, when they have the benefit of strong national institutional arrangements and less fragmented union patterns, are more likely to be cohesive and experienced and therefore able to challenge management and sometimes win significant arguments over strategy.",
author = "Michela Cavallini and Michael Gold and Anthony Royle and Iacopo Senatori",
year = "2016",
month = jun,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0959680115602357",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "115 -- 130",
journal = "European journal of industrial relations",
issn = "0959-6801",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Home country advantage? The influence of Italian, German and Austrian employee representatives in the UniCredit European Works Council

AU - Cavallini, Michela

AU - Gold, Michael

AU - Royle, Anthony

AU - Senatori, Iacopo

PY - 2016/6/1

Y1 - 2016/6/1

N2 - This article examines the first European Works Council (EWC) to be established in the Italian banking sector, at UniCredit. It focuses on the interaction between Italian, German and Austrian delegations of employee representatives and on the perspectives and practices that reflect their different cultural and institutional backgrounds in industrial relations. Much of the literature suggests that employee representatives from the home country of a multinational company are likely to mould EWC structures in accordance with their own national backgrounds and have greater confidence in dealing with central management in EWC meetings. Our findings partly substantiate this argument, but also suggest that minority delegations, when they have the benefit of strong national institutional arrangements and less fragmented union patterns, are more likely to be cohesive and experienced and therefore able to challenge management and sometimes win significant arguments over strategy.

AB - This article examines the first European Works Council (EWC) to be established in the Italian banking sector, at UniCredit. It focuses on the interaction between Italian, German and Austrian delegations of employee representatives and on the perspectives and practices that reflect their different cultural and institutional backgrounds in industrial relations. Much of the literature suggests that employee representatives from the home country of a multinational company are likely to mould EWC structures in accordance with their own national backgrounds and have greater confidence in dealing with central management in EWC meetings. Our findings partly substantiate this argument, but also suggest that minority delegations, when they have the benefit of strong national institutional arrangements and less fragmented union patterns, are more likely to be cohesive and experienced and therefore able to challenge management and sometimes win significant arguments over strategy.

U2 - 10.1177/0959680115602357

DO - 10.1177/0959680115602357

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 115

EP - 130

JO - European journal of industrial relations

JF - European journal of industrial relations

SN - 0959-6801

IS - 2

ER -