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Initial operation of the recoil mass spectrometer EMMA at the ISAC-II facility of TRIUMF

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Author(s)

  • B. Davids
  • M. Williams
  • N. E. Esker
  • M. Alcorta
  • D. Connolly
  • B. R. Fulton
  • K. Hudson
  • N. Khan
  • O. S. Kirsebom
  • J. Lighthall
  • P. Machule

Department/unit(s)

Publication details

JournalNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment
DateAccepted/In press - 25 Mar 2019
DateE-pub ahead of print - 3 Apr 2019
DatePublished (current) - 21 Jun 2019
Volume930
Number of pages5
Pages (from-to)191-195
Early online date3/04/19
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

The Electromagnetic Mass Analyser (EMMA) is a new vacuum-mode recoil mass spectrometer currently undergoing the final stages of commissioning at the ISAC-II facility of TRIUMF. EMMA employs a symmetric configuration of electrostatic and magnetic deflectors to separate the products of nuclear reactions from the beam, focus them in both energy and angle, and disperse them in a focal plane according to their mass/charge (m∕q) ratios. The spectrometer was designed to accommodate the γ-ray detector array TIGRESS around the target position in order to provide spectroscopic information from electromagnetic transitions. EMMA is intended to be used in the measurement of fusion evaporation, radiative capture, and transfer reactions for the study of nuclear structure and astrophysics. Its complement of focal plane detectors facilitates the identification of recoiling nuclei and subsequent recoil decay spectroscopy. Here we describe the facility and report on commissioning efforts.

Bibliographical note

© 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy.

    Research areas

  • Electromagnetic separator, Recoil mass spectrometer, Recoil separator

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