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Insertion and deletion in Northern English (ng): Interacting innovations in the life cycle of phonological processes

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Insertion and deletion in Northern English (ng) : Interacting innovations in the life cycle of phonological processes. / Bailey, George.

In: Journal of Linguistics, Vol. 0, 15.12.2020, p. 1.

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Harvard

Bailey, G 2020, 'Insertion and deletion in Northern English (ng): Interacting innovations in the life cycle of phonological processes', Journal of Linguistics, vol. 0, pp. 1. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0022226720000365

APA

Bailey, G. (2020). Insertion and deletion in Northern English (ng): Interacting innovations in the life cycle of phonological processes. Journal of Linguistics, 0, 1. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0022226720000365

Vancouver

Bailey G. Insertion and deletion in Northern English (ng): Interacting innovations in the life cycle of phonological processes. Journal of Linguistics. 2020 Dec 15;0:1. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0022226720000365

Author

Bailey, George. / Insertion and deletion in Northern English (ng) : Interacting innovations in the life cycle of phonological processes. In: Journal of Linguistics. 2020 ; Vol. 0. pp. 1.

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@article{05e8dc0862204ecfa678cc9bdac78aeb,
title = "Insertion and deletion in Northern English (ng): Interacting innovations in the life cycle of phonological processes",
abstract = "In north western varieties of British English the historical process of ng-coalescence that simplified nasal+stop clusters in words like wrong and singer never ran to completion, with surface variation between [{\ng}] and [{\ng}ɡ] remaining to this day. This paper presents an empirical study of this synchronic variation, specifically to test predictions made by the life cycle of phonological processes; a diachronic account of /ɡ/-deletion has been proposed under this framework, but crucially the life cycle makes hitherto-untested predictions regarding the synchronic behaviour of (ng) in North West England. Data from 30 sociolinguistic interviews indicate that these predictions are largely met: internal constraints on the variable are almost entirely accounted for by assuming cyclic application of /ɡ/-deletion across a stratified phonology. There is also evidence of apparent-time change in the pre-pausal environment, which is becoming increasingly [ɡ]-favouring contrary to the life cycle{\textquoteright}s predictions. It is argued that this reflects a separate innovation in the life cycle of (ng), with synchronic variation reflecting two processes: the original deletion overlaid with a prosodically-conditioned insertion process. These results have implications for theories of language change and the architecture of grammar, and add to a growing body of evidence suggesting that the effect of pause on probabilistic phenomena can be synchronically variable and diachronically unstable.",
keywords = "life cycle of phonological processes, variation, sound change, phonology, velar nasal, dialects of English",
author = "George Bailey",
year = "2020",
month = dec,
day = "15",
doi = "10.1017/S0022226720000365",
language = "English",
volume = "0",
pages = "1",
journal = "Journal of Linguistics",
issn = "0022-2267",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Insertion and deletion in Northern English (ng)

T2 - Interacting innovations in the life cycle of phonological processes

AU - Bailey, George

PY - 2020/12/15

Y1 - 2020/12/15

N2 - In north western varieties of British English the historical process of ng-coalescence that simplified nasal+stop clusters in words like wrong and singer never ran to completion, with surface variation between [ŋ] and [ŋɡ] remaining to this day. This paper presents an empirical study of this synchronic variation, specifically to test predictions made by the life cycle of phonological processes; a diachronic account of /ɡ/-deletion has been proposed under this framework, but crucially the life cycle makes hitherto-untested predictions regarding the synchronic behaviour of (ng) in North West England. Data from 30 sociolinguistic interviews indicate that these predictions are largely met: internal constraints on the variable are almost entirely accounted for by assuming cyclic application of /ɡ/-deletion across a stratified phonology. There is also evidence of apparent-time change in the pre-pausal environment, which is becoming increasingly [ɡ]-favouring contrary to the life cycle’s predictions. It is argued that this reflects a separate innovation in the life cycle of (ng), with synchronic variation reflecting two processes: the original deletion overlaid with a prosodically-conditioned insertion process. These results have implications for theories of language change and the architecture of grammar, and add to a growing body of evidence suggesting that the effect of pause on probabilistic phenomena can be synchronically variable and diachronically unstable.

AB - In north western varieties of British English the historical process of ng-coalescence that simplified nasal+stop clusters in words like wrong and singer never ran to completion, with surface variation between [ŋ] and [ŋɡ] remaining to this day. This paper presents an empirical study of this synchronic variation, specifically to test predictions made by the life cycle of phonological processes; a diachronic account of /ɡ/-deletion has been proposed under this framework, but crucially the life cycle makes hitherto-untested predictions regarding the synchronic behaviour of (ng) in North West England. Data from 30 sociolinguistic interviews indicate that these predictions are largely met: internal constraints on the variable are almost entirely accounted for by assuming cyclic application of /ɡ/-deletion across a stratified phonology. There is also evidence of apparent-time change in the pre-pausal environment, which is becoming increasingly [ɡ]-favouring contrary to the life cycle’s predictions. It is argued that this reflects a separate innovation in the life cycle of (ng), with synchronic variation reflecting two processes: the original deletion overlaid with a prosodically-conditioned insertion process. These results have implications for theories of language change and the architecture of grammar, and add to a growing body of evidence suggesting that the effect of pause on probabilistic phenomena can be synchronically variable and diachronically unstable.

KW - life cycle of phonological processes

KW - variation

KW - sound change

KW - phonology

KW - velar nasal

KW - dialects of English

U2 - 10.1017/S0022226720000365

DO - 10.1017/S0022226720000365

M3 - Article

VL - 0

SP - 1

JO - Journal of Linguistics

JF - Journal of Linguistics

SN - 0022-2267

ER -