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Investigating the function of prehistoric stone bowls and griddle stones in the Aleutian Islands by lipid residue analysis

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Investigating the function of prehistoric stone bowls and griddle stones in the Aleutian Islands by lipid residue analysis. / Admiraal, Marjolein; Lucquin, Alexandre Jules Andre; Von Tersch, Matthew; Jordan, Peter D.; Craig, Oliver Edward.

In: QUATERNARY RESEARCH, 04.06.2018.

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Harvard

Admiraal, M, Lucquin, AJA, Von Tersch, M, Jordan, PD & Craig, OE 2018, 'Investigating the function of prehistoric stone bowls and griddle stones in the Aleutian Islands by lipid residue analysis', QUATERNARY RESEARCH. https://doi.org/10.1017/qua.2018.31

APA

Admiraal, M., Lucquin, A. J. A., Von Tersch, M., Jordan, P. D., & Craig, O. E. (2018). Investigating the function of prehistoric stone bowls and griddle stones in the Aleutian Islands by lipid residue analysis. QUATERNARY RESEARCH. https://doi.org/10.1017/qua.2018.31

Vancouver

Admiraal M, Lucquin AJA, Von Tersch M, Jordan PD, Craig OE. Investigating the function of prehistoric stone bowls and griddle stones in the Aleutian Islands by lipid residue analysis. QUATERNARY RESEARCH. 2018 Jun 4. https://doi.org/10.1017/qua.2018.31

Author

Admiraal, Marjolein ; Lucquin, Alexandre Jules Andre ; Von Tersch, Matthew ; Jordan, Peter D. ; Craig, Oliver Edward. / Investigating the function of prehistoric stone bowls and griddle stones in the Aleutian Islands by lipid residue analysis. In: QUATERNARY RESEARCH. 2018.

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@article{142e1143983c4eb1a8c7687958508b7d,
title = "Investigating the function of prehistoric stone bowls and griddle stones in the Aleutian Islands by lipid residue analysis",
abstract = "The earliest durable cooking technologies found in Alaska are stone bowls and griddle stones recovered from the Aleutian Islands. This article aims to identify the function of these artefacts. Molecular and chemical analyses of carbonised residues found on their surfaces confirm that these artefacts were used to process marine resources. Both artefacts have high lipid content and C:N ratios, suggesting they were used to process oily substances. Stable isotope results of individual lipids suggest that they were used to process different sets of resources within the aquatic spectrum as griddle stones have slightly more 13C-depleted lipids than stone bowls, possibly indicating more variable use. Integration of these results with archaeological and ethnographic data leads us to infer that griddle stones were used for cooking a diversity of aquatic resources, possibly with the addition of plant foods, whereas stone bowls were specifically used to render marine mammal fats. We further hypothesize that a sudden peak in stone bowl frequencies at 4000–3000 cal yr BP was connected to a Neoglacial cold spell bringing sea ice conditions to the Aleutian Islands. This may have led to new subsistence strategies in which the rendering of marine mammal fats played a central role.",
author = "Marjolein Admiraal and Lucquin, {Alexandre Jules Andre} and {Von Tersch}, Matthew and Jordan, {Peter D.} and Craig, {Oliver Edward}",
note = "{\circledC} University of Washington. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2018. This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "4",
doi = "10.1017/qua.2018.31",
language = "English",
journal = "QUATERNARY RESEARCH",
issn = "0033-5894",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Investigating the function of prehistoric stone bowls and griddle stones in the Aleutian Islands by lipid residue analysis

AU - Admiraal, Marjolein

AU - Lucquin, Alexandre Jules Andre

AU - Von Tersch, Matthew

AU - Jordan, Peter D.

AU - Craig, Oliver Edward

N1 - © University of Washington. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2018. This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details

PY - 2018/6/4

Y1 - 2018/6/4

N2 - The earliest durable cooking technologies found in Alaska are stone bowls and griddle stones recovered from the Aleutian Islands. This article aims to identify the function of these artefacts. Molecular and chemical analyses of carbonised residues found on their surfaces confirm that these artefacts were used to process marine resources. Both artefacts have high lipid content and C:N ratios, suggesting they were used to process oily substances. Stable isotope results of individual lipids suggest that they were used to process different sets of resources within the aquatic spectrum as griddle stones have slightly more 13C-depleted lipids than stone bowls, possibly indicating more variable use. Integration of these results with archaeological and ethnographic data leads us to infer that griddle stones were used for cooking a diversity of aquatic resources, possibly with the addition of plant foods, whereas stone bowls were specifically used to render marine mammal fats. We further hypothesize that a sudden peak in stone bowl frequencies at 4000–3000 cal yr BP was connected to a Neoglacial cold spell bringing sea ice conditions to the Aleutian Islands. This may have led to new subsistence strategies in which the rendering of marine mammal fats played a central role.

AB - The earliest durable cooking technologies found in Alaska are stone bowls and griddle stones recovered from the Aleutian Islands. This article aims to identify the function of these artefacts. Molecular and chemical analyses of carbonised residues found on their surfaces confirm that these artefacts were used to process marine resources. Both artefacts have high lipid content and C:N ratios, suggesting they were used to process oily substances. Stable isotope results of individual lipids suggest that they were used to process different sets of resources within the aquatic spectrum as griddle stones have slightly more 13C-depleted lipids than stone bowls, possibly indicating more variable use. Integration of these results with archaeological and ethnographic data leads us to infer that griddle stones were used for cooking a diversity of aquatic resources, possibly with the addition of plant foods, whereas stone bowls were specifically used to render marine mammal fats. We further hypothesize that a sudden peak in stone bowl frequencies at 4000–3000 cal yr BP was connected to a Neoglacial cold spell bringing sea ice conditions to the Aleutian Islands. This may have led to new subsistence strategies in which the rendering of marine mammal fats played a central role.

U2 - 10.1017/qua.2018.31

DO - 10.1017/qua.2018.31

M3 - Article

JO - QUATERNARY RESEARCH

T2 - QUATERNARY RESEARCH

JF - QUATERNARY RESEARCH

SN - 0033-5894

ER -