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From the same journal

Living in non-permanent accommodation in England: liminal experiences of home

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Living in non-permanent accommodation in England : liminal experiences of home. / Bevan, M.

In: Housing Studies, Vol. 26, No. 4, 06.2011, p. 541-554.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Bevan, M 2011, 'Living in non-permanent accommodation in England: liminal experiences of home', Housing Studies, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 541-554. https://doi.org/10.1080/02673037.2011.559723

APA

Bevan, M. (2011). Living in non-permanent accommodation in England: liminal experiences of home. Housing Studies, 26(4), 541-554. https://doi.org/10.1080/02673037.2011.559723

Vancouver

Bevan M. Living in non-permanent accommodation in England: liminal experiences of home. Housing Studies. 2011 Jun;26(4):541-554. https://doi.org/10.1080/02673037.2011.559723

Author

Bevan, M. / Living in non-permanent accommodation in England : liminal experiences of home. In: Housing Studies. 2011 ; Vol. 26, No. 4. pp. 541-554.

Bibtex - Download

@article{bfe41046265e44f5865cdaacf3b615ac,
title = "Living in non-permanent accommodation in England: liminal experiences of home",
abstract = "This paper reports research on people who live in housing that is defined as non-permanent by policy makers in England, and focuses on two particular groups: residents of park homes and residential boaters. The paper emphasises how the distinctive environments in which such housing is set may facilitate particular lifestyles, contributing to residents' identities. The notion of liminality is used as a framework to help understand the views of residents, highlighting the diversity of their experiences. Both park home residents and residential boaters ascribed a range of positive qualities to the environments in which they lived, underscored by the perception that the spaces that such accommodation occupied were often associated with leisure. Nevertheless, the nature of tenure relations in both settings potentially leads to vulnerabilities in the way that some people can maintain these lifestyles. These positive and negative facets were reflected in ambivalent feelings towards home both between groups of respondents and within individuals",
author = "M. Bevan",
year = "2011",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1080/02673037.2011.559723",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "541--554",
journal = "Housing Studies",
issn = "0267-3037",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Living in non-permanent accommodation in England

T2 - liminal experiences of home

AU - Bevan, M.

PY - 2011/6

Y1 - 2011/6

N2 - This paper reports research on people who live in housing that is defined as non-permanent by policy makers in England, and focuses on two particular groups: residents of park homes and residential boaters. The paper emphasises how the distinctive environments in which such housing is set may facilitate particular lifestyles, contributing to residents' identities. The notion of liminality is used as a framework to help understand the views of residents, highlighting the diversity of their experiences. Both park home residents and residential boaters ascribed a range of positive qualities to the environments in which they lived, underscored by the perception that the spaces that such accommodation occupied were often associated with leisure. Nevertheless, the nature of tenure relations in both settings potentially leads to vulnerabilities in the way that some people can maintain these lifestyles. These positive and negative facets were reflected in ambivalent feelings towards home both between groups of respondents and within individuals

AB - This paper reports research on people who live in housing that is defined as non-permanent by policy makers in England, and focuses on two particular groups: residents of park homes and residential boaters. The paper emphasises how the distinctive environments in which such housing is set may facilitate particular lifestyles, contributing to residents' identities. The notion of liminality is used as a framework to help understand the views of residents, highlighting the diversity of their experiences. Both park home residents and residential boaters ascribed a range of positive qualities to the environments in which they lived, underscored by the perception that the spaces that such accommodation occupied were often associated with leisure. Nevertheless, the nature of tenure relations in both settings potentially leads to vulnerabilities in the way that some people can maintain these lifestyles. These positive and negative facets were reflected in ambivalent feelings towards home both between groups of respondents and within individuals

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79956336462&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02673037.2011.559723

DO - 10.1080/02673037.2011.559723

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 541

EP - 554

JO - Housing Studies

JF - Housing Studies

SN - 0267-3037

IS - 4

ER -