By the same authors

From the same journal

From the same journal

Living on a low income and using banks to pay bills

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Living on a low income and using banks to pay bills. / Nice, Katharine; Irvine, Annie.

In: The Journal of Poverty and Social Justice, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.02.2010, p. 53-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Nice, K & Irvine, A 2010, 'Living on a low income and using banks to pay bills', The Journal of Poverty and Social Justice, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 53-67. https://doi.org/10.1332/175982710790795166

APA

Nice, K., & Irvine, A. (2010). Living on a low income and using banks to pay bills. The Journal of Poverty and Social Justice, 18(1), 53-67. https://doi.org/10.1332/175982710790795166

Vancouver

Nice K, Irvine A. Living on a low income and using banks to pay bills. The Journal of Poverty and Social Justice. 2010 Feb 1;18(1):53-67. https://doi.org/10.1332/175982710790795166

Author

Nice, Katharine ; Irvine, Annie. / Living on a low income and using banks to pay bills. In: The Journal of Poverty and Social Justice. 2010 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 53-67.

Bibtex - Download

@article{92fdddba58dc44d281a7ff56f6745796,
title = "Living on a low income and using banks to pay bills",
abstract = "This article discusses the use of automated banking facilities among people on low incomes. In doing so, it questions assumptions inherent in recent UK government policy that making full use of banking facilities to pay bills is a universally desirable norm. The article presents qualitative research evidence to explore how and why people on low incomes do and do not use banks, and automated payments in particular. Supporting the findings of previous research, the article describes how low financial resources can be a barrier to using automatic transfers, but also notes how personal choice, familiarity and routine can also influence preferences. Therefore, it is argued that a range of policy responses may be necessary to facilitate higher transactional use of bank accounts.",
keywords = "banking, low income households, personal finances, automatic transfers",
author = "Katharine Nice and Annie Irvine",
note = "This is a post-peer-review, pre-copy edited version of an article published in The Journal of Poverty and Social Justice. The definitive publisher-authenticated version: Nice, K. and Irvine, A. (2010) Living on a low income and using banks to pay bills, The Journal of Poverty and Social Justice, 18, 1, 53-67. is available online at: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/tpp/jpsj/2010/00000018/00000001/art00005",
year = "2010",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1332/175982710790795166",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "53--67",
journal = "The Journal of Poverty and Social Justice",
issn = "1759-8273",
publisher = "The Policy Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Living on a low income and using banks to pay bills

AU - Nice, Katharine

AU - Irvine, Annie

N1 - This is a post-peer-review, pre-copy edited version of an article published in The Journal of Poverty and Social Justice. The definitive publisher-authenticated version: Nice, K. and Irvine, A. (2010) Living on a low income and using banks to pay bills, The Journal of Poverty and Social Justice, 18, 1, 53-67. is available online at: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/tpp/jpsj/2010/00000018/00000001/art00005

PY - 2010/2/1

Y1 - 2010/2/1

N2 - This article discusses the use of automated banking facilities among people on low incomes. In doing so, it questions assumptions inherent in recent UK government policy that making full use of banking facilities to pay bills is a universally desirable norm. The article presents qualitative research evidence to explore how and why people on low incomes do and do not use banks, and automated payments in particular. Supporting the findings of previous research, the article describes how low financial resources can be a barrier to using automatic transfers, but also notes how personal choice, familiarity and routine can also influence preferences. Therefore, it is argued that a range of policy responses may be necessary to facilitate higher transactional use of bank accounts.

AB - This article discusses the use of automated banking facilities among people on low incomes. In doing so, it questions assumptions inherent in recent UK government policy that making full use of banking facilities to pay bills is a universally desirable norm. The article presents qualitative research evidence to explore how and why people on low incomes do and do not use banks, and automated payments in particular. Supporting the findings of previous research, the article describes how low financial resources can be a barrier to using automatic transfers, but also notes how personal choice, familiarity and routine can also influence preferences. Therefore, it is argued that a range of policy responses may be necessary to facilitate higher transactional use of bank accounts.

KW - banking

KW - low income households

KW - personal finances

KW - automatic transfers

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U2 - 10.1332/175982710790795166

DO - 10.1332/175982710790795166

M3 - Article

VL - 18

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JO - The Journal of Poverty and Social Justice

JF - The Journal of Poverty and Social Justice

SN - 1759-8273

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ER -