By the same authors

From the same journal

From the same journal

Local Adaptation to Soil Hypoxia Determines the Structure of an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Community in Roots from Natural CO2 Springs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Author(s)

Department/unit(s)

Publication details

JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
DatePublished - Jul 2011
Issue number14
Volume77
Number of pages8
Pages (from-to)4770-4777
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

The processes responsible for producing and maintaining the diversity of natural arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal communities remain largely unknown. We used natural CO2 springs (mofettes), which create hypoxic soil environments, to determine whether a long-term, directional, abiotic selection pressure could change AM fungal community structure and drive the selection of particular AM fungal phylotypes. We explored whether those phylotypes that appear exclusively in hypoxic soils are local specialists or widespread generalists able to tolerate a range of soil conditions. AM fungal community composition was characterized by cloning, restriction fragment length polymorphism typing, and the sequencing of small subunit rRNA genes from roots of four plant species growing at high (hypoxic) and low (control) geological CO2 exposure. We found significant levels of AM fungal community turnover (beta diversity) between soil types and the numerical dominance of two AM fungal phylotypes in hypoxic soils. Our results strongly suggest that direct environmental selection acting on AM fungi is a major factor regulating AM fungal communities and their phylogeographic patterns. Consequently, some AM fungi are more strongly associated with local variations in the soil environment than with their host plant's distribution.

    Research areas

  • CARBON-DIOXIDE, DIVERSITY, PLANTS, GLOMEROMYCOTA, WOODLAND, L., PHOTOSYNTHESIS, BIODIVERSITY, EVOLUTION, ECOSYSTEM

Discover related content

Find related publications, people, projects, datasets and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations