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Mechanical adaptation of trabecular bone morphology in the mammalian mandible

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Mechanical adaptation of trabecular bone morphology in the mammalian mandible. / Watson, Peter; Fitton, Laura Catherine; Meloro, Carlo; Fagan, Michael; Groening, Flora.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 8, No. 7277, 7277, 08.05.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Watson, P, Fitton, LC, Meloro, C, Fagan, M & Groening, F 2018, 'Mechanical adaptation of trabecular bone morphology in the mammalian mandible', Scientific Reports, vol. 8, no. 7277, 7277. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-25597-0

APA

Watson, P., Fitton, L. C., Meloro, C., Fagan, M., & Groening, F. (2018). Mechanical adaptation of trabecular bone morphology in the mammalian mandible. Scientific Reports, 8(7277), [7277]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-25597-0

Vancouver

Watson P, Fitton LC, Meloro C, Fagan M, Groening F. Mechanical adaptation of trabecular bone morphology in the mammalian mandible. Scientific Reports. 2018 May 8;8(7277). 7277. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-25597-0

Author

Watson, Peter ; Fitton, Laura Catherine ; Meloro, Carlo ; Fagan, Michael ; Groening, Flora. / Mechanical adaptation of trabecular bone morphology in the mammalian mandible. In: Scientific Reports. 2018 ; Vol. 8, No. 7277.

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@article{84671d05a1e54940a9e2935d4c7ac5cf,
title = "Mechanical adaptation of trabecular bone morphology in the mammalian mandible",
abstract = "Alveolar bone, together with the underlying trabecular bone, fulfils an important role in providing structural support against masticatory forces. Diseases such as osteoporosis or periodontitis cause alveolar bone resorption which weakens this structural support and is a major cause of tooth loss. However, the functional relationship between alveolar bone remodelling within the molar region and masticatory forces is not well understood. This study investigated this relationship by comparing mammalian species with different diets and functional loading (Felis catus, Cercocebus atys, Homo sapiens, Sus scrofa, Oryctolagus cuniculus, Ovis aries). We performed histomorphometric analyses of trabecular bone morphology (bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness and trabecular spacing) and quantified the variation of bone and tooth root volumes along the tooth row. A principal component analysis and non-parametric MANOVA showed statistically significant differences in trabecular bone morphology between species with contrasting functional loading, but these differences were not seen in sub-adult specimens. Our results support a strong, but complex link between masticatory function and trabecular bone morphology. Further understanding of a potential functional relationship could aid the diagnosis and treatment of mandibular diseases causing alveolar bone resorption, and guide the design and evaluation of dental implants.",
author = "Peter Watson and Fitton, {Laura Catherine} and Carlo Meloro and Michael Fagan and Flora Groening",
note = "{\circledC} The Author(s) 2018",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "8",
doi = "10.1038/s41598-018-25597-0",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Springer Nature",
number = "7277",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mechanical adaptation of trabecular bone morphology in the mammalian mandible

AU - Watson, Peter

AU - Fitton, Laura Catherine

AU - Meloro, Carlo

AU - Fagan, Michael

AU - Groening, Flora

N1 - © The Author(s) 2018

PY - 2018/5/8

Y1 - 2018/5/8

N2 - Alveolar bone, together with the underlying trabecular bone, fulfils an important role in providing structural support against masticatory forces. Diseases such as osteoporosis or periodontitis cause alveolar bone resorption which weakens this structural support and is a major cause of tooth loss. However, the functional relationship between alveolar bone remodelling within the molar region and masticatory forces is not well understood. This study investigated this relationship by comparing mammalian species with different diets and functional loading (Felis catus, Cercocebus atys, Homo sapiens, Sus scrofa, Oryctolagus cuniculus, Ovis aries). We performed histomorphometric analyses of trabecular bone morphology (bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness and trabecular spacing) and quantified the variation of bone and tooth root volumes along the tooth row. A principal component analysis and non-parametric MANOVA showed statistically significant differences in trabecular bone morphology between species with contrasting functional loading, but these differences were not seen in sub-adult specimens. Our results support a strong, but complex link between masticatory function and trabecular bone morphology. Further understanding of a potential functional relationship could aid the diagnosis and treatment of mandibular diseases causing alveolar bone resorption, and guide the design and evaluation of dental implants.

AB - Alveolar bone, together with the underlying trabecular bone, fulfils an important role in providing structural support against masticatory forces. Diseases such as osteoporosis or periodontitis cause alveolar bone resorption which weakens this structural support and is a major cause of tooth loss. However, the functional relationship between alveolar bone remodelling within the molar region and masticatory forces is not well understood. This study investigated this relationship by comparing mammalian species with different diets and functional loading (Felis catus, Cercocebus atys, Homo sapiens, Sus scrofa, Oryctolagus cuniculus, Ovis aries). We performed histomorphometric analyses of trabecular bone morphology (bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness and trabecular spacing) and quantified the variation of bone and tooth root volumes along the tooth row. A principal component analysis and non-parametric MANOVA showed statistically significant differences in trabecular bone morphology between species with contrasting functional loading, but these differences were not seen in sub-adult specimens. Our results support a strong, but complex link between masticatory function and trabecular bone morphology. Further understanding of a potential functional relationship could aid the diagnosis and treatment of mandibular diseases causing alveolar bone resorption, and guide the design and evaluation of dental implants.

U2 - 10.1038/s41598-018-25597-0

DO - 10.1038/s41598-018-25597-0

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - Scientific Reports

T2 - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

IS - 7277

M1 - 7277

ER -