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Monozygotic twin differences in school performance are stable and systematic

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Monozygotic twin differences in school performance are stable and systematic. / von Stumm, Sophie; Plomin, Robert.

In: Developmental Science, Vol. 21, No. 6, e12694, 01.11.2018.

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Harvard

von Stumm, S & Plomin, R 2018, 'Monozygotic twin differences in school performance are stable and systematic', Developmental Science, vol. 21, no. 6, e12694. https://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12694

APA

von Stumm, S., & Plomin, R. (2018). Monozygotic twin differences in school performance are stable and systematic. Developmental Science, 21(6), [e12694]. https://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12694

Vancouver

von Stumm S, Plomin R. Monozygotic twin differences in school performance are stable and systematic. Developmental Science. 2018 Nov 1;21(6). e12694. https://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12694

Author

von Stumm, Sophie ; Plomin, Robert. / Monozygotic twin differences in school performance are stable and systematic. In: Developmental Science. 2018 ; Vol. 21, No. 6.

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@article{2a498a3a8673486c8a9b9fe214fe2961,
title = "Monozygotic twin differences in school performance are stable and systematic",
abstract = "School performance is one of the most stable and heritable psychological characteristics. Notwithstanding, monozygotic twins (MZ), who have identical genotypes, differ in school performance. These MZ differences result from non-shared environments that do not contribute to the similarity within twin pairs. Because to date few non-shared environmental factors have been reliably associated with MZ differences in school performance, they are thought to be idiosyncratic and due to chance, suggesting that the effect of non-shared environments on MZ differences are age- and trait-specific. In a sample of 2768 MZ twin pairs, we found first that MZ differences in school performance were moderately stable from age 12 through 16, with differences at the ages 12 and 14 accounting for 20% of the variance in MZ differences at age 16. Second, MZ differences in school performance correlated positively with MZ differences across 16 learning-related variables, including measures of intelligence, personality and school attitudes, with the twin who scored higher on one also scoring higher on the other measures. Finally, MZ differences in the 16 learning-related variables accounted for 22% of the variance in MZ differences in school performance at age 16. These findings suggest that, unlike for other psychological domains, non-shared environmental factors affect school performance in systematic ways that have long-term and generalist influence. Our findings should motivate the search for non-shared environmental factors responsible for the stable and systematic effects on children{\textquoteright}s differences in school performance. A video abstract of this article can be viewed at: https://youtu.be/0bw2Fl_HGq0.",
keywords = "difference scores, learning, Monozygotic twin, non-shared environment, school performance",
author = "{von Stumm}, Sophie and Robert Plomin",
year = "2018",
month = nov,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/desc.12694",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
journal = "Developmental Science",
issn = "1363-755X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Monozygotic twin differences in school performance are stable and systematic

AU - von Stumm, Sophie

AU - Plomin, Robert

PY - 2018/11/1

Y1 - 2018/11/1

N2 - School performance is one of the most stable and heritable psychological characteristics. Notwithstanding, monozygotic twins (MZ), who have identical genotypes, differ in school performance. These MZ differences result from non-shared environments that do not contribute to the similarity within twin pairs. Because to date few non-shared environmental factors have been reliably associated with MZ differences in school performance, they are thought to be idiosyncratic and due to chance, suggesting that the effect of non-shared environments on MZ differences are age- and trait-specific. In a sample of 2768 MZ twin pairs, we found first that MZ differences in school performance were moderately stable from age 12 through 16, with differences at the ages 12 and 14 accounting for 20% of the variance in MZ differences at age 16. Second, MZ differences in school performance correlated positively with MZ differences across 16 learning-related variables, including measures of intelligence, personality and school attitudes, with the twin who scored higher on one also scoring higher on the other measures. Finally, MZ differences in the 16 learning-related variables accounted for 22% of the variance in MZ differences in school performance at age 16. These findings suggest that, unlike for other psychological domains, non-shared environmental factors affect school performance in systematic ways that have long-term and generalist influence. Our findings should motivate the search for non-shared environmental factors responsible for the stable and systematic effects on children’s differences in school performance. A video abstract of this article can be viewed at: https://youtu.be/0bw2Fl_HGq0.

AB - School performance is one of the most stable and heritable psychological characteristics. Notwithstanding, monozygotic twins (MZ), who have identical genotypes, differ in school performance. These MZ differences result from non-shared environments that do not contribute to the similarity within twin pairs. Because to date few non-shared environmental factors have been reliably associated with MZ differences in school performance, they are thought to be idiosyncratic and due to chance, suggesting that the effect of non-shared environments on MZ differences are age- and trait-specific. In a sample of 2768 MZ twin pairs, we found first that MZ differences in school performance were moderately stable from age 12 through 16, with differences at the ages 12 and 14 accounting for 20% of the variance in MZ differences at age 16. Second, MZ differences in school performance correlated positively with MZ differences across 16 learning-related variables, including measures of intelligence, personality and school attitudes, with the twin who scored higher on one also scoring higher on the other measures. Finally, MZ differences in the 16 learning-related variables accounted for 22% of the variance in MZ differences in school performance at age 16. These findings suggest that, unlike for other psychological domains, non-shared environmental factors affect school performance in systematic ways that have long-term and generalist influence. Our findings should motivate the search for non-shared environmental factors responsible for the stable and systematic effects on children’s differences in school performance. A video abstract of this article can be viewed at: https://youtu.be/0bw2Fl_HGq0.

KW - difference scores

KW - learning

KW - Monozygotic twin

KW - non-shared environment

KW - school performance

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85055465492&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/desc.12694

DO - 10.1111/desc.12694

M3 - Article

C2 - 29920866

AN - SCOPUS:85055465492

VL - 21

JO - Developmental Science

JF - Developmental Science

SN - 1363-755X

IS - 6

M1 - e12694

ER -