From the same journal

From the same journal

Monsters in cyberspace: cyberphobia and cultural panic in the information age

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

Monsters in cyberspace : cyberphobia and cultural panic in the information age. / Sandywell, B.

In: Information, Communication and Society, Vol. 9, No. 1, 02.2006, p. 39-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Sandywell, B 2006, 'Monsters in cyberspace: cyberphobia and cultural panic in the information age', Information, Communication and Society, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 39-61. https://doi.org/10.1080/13691180500519407

APA

Sandywell, B. (2006). Monsters in cyberspace: cyberphobia and cultural panic in the information age. Information, Communication and Society, 9(1), 39-61. https://doi.org/10.1080/13691180500519407

Vancouver

Sandywell B. Monsters in cyberspace: cyberphobia and cultural panic in the information age. Information, Communication and Society. 2006 Feb;9(1):39-61. https://doi.org/10.1080/13691180500519407

Author

Sandywell, B. / Monsters in cyberspace : cyberphobia and cultural panic in the information age. In: Information, Communication and Society. 2006 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 39-61.

Bibtex - Download

@article{22fe0245fa4f46e59ba3308fc22731f8,
title = "Monsters in cyberspace: cyberphobia and cultural panic in the information age",
abstract = "This paper explores popular attitudes toward the Internet (and computer-mediated communication more generally) by mapping some of the more threatening, transgressive and 'monstrous' images associated with cyberspace. An account of risk consciousness is developed in three parts: (1) comparisons with earlier information technologies reveals similarities and differences with regard to public attitudes toward cyberspace and its risks; (2) the development of a model of contemporary teratological space derived from images of boundary-dissolving threats, intrusive alterities and existential ambivalences created by the erosion of binary distinctions and hierarchies; and (3) possible historical and sociological explanations of cyberpanic drawing on recent theorizations of globalization (capitalism/information society theory, risk society theory, reflexive modernization theory, and alterity theory).",
author = "B. Sandywell",
year = "2006",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1080/13691180500519407",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "39--61",
journal = "Information, Communication and Society",
issn = "1369-118X",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Monsters in cyberspace

T2 - cyberphobia and cultural panic in the information age

AU - Sandywell, B.

PY - 2006/2

Y1 - 2006/2

N2 - This paper explores popular attitudes toward the Internet (and computer-mediated communication more generally) by mapping some of the more threatening, transgressive and 'monstrous' images associated with cyberspace. An account of risk consciousness is developed in three parts: (1) comparisons with earlier information technologies reveals similarities and differences with regard to public attitudes toward cyberspace and its risks; (2) the development of a model of contemporary teratological space derived from images of boundary-dissolving threats, intrusive alterities and existential ambivalences created by the erosion of binary distinctions and hierarchies; and (3) possible historical and sociological explanations of cyberpanic drawing on recent theorizations of globalization (capitalism/information society theory, risk society theory, reflexive modernization theory, and alterity theory).

AB - This paper explores popular attitudes toward the Internet (and computer-mediated communication more generally) by mapping some of the more threatening, transgressive and 'monstrous' images associated with cyberspace. An account of risk consciousness is developed in three parts: (1) comparisons with earlier information technologies reveals similarities and differences with regard to public attitudes toward cyberspace and its risks; (2) the development of a model of contemporary teratological space derived from images of boundary-dissolving threats, intrusive alterities and existential ambivalences created by the erosion of binary distinctions and hierarchies; and (3) possible historical and sociological explanations of cyberpanic drawing on recent theorizations of globalization (capitalism/information society theory, risk society theory, reflexive modernization theory, and alterity theory).

U2 - 10.1080/13691180500519407

DO - 10.1080/13691180500519407

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 39

EP - 61

JO - Information, Communication and Society

JF - Information, Communication and Society

SN - 1369-118X

IS - 1

ER -