By the same authors

Myth as Metaphors: Understanding Narratives in Sustaining sacred landscapes in Zimbabwe and Australia

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Standard

Myth as Metaphors : Understanding Narratives in Sustaining sacred landscapes in Zimbabwe and Australia. / Sinamai, Ashton.

Archives, Objects, Places and Landscapes: Multidisciplinary approaches to Decolonised Zimbabwean pasts. ed. / Munyaradzi Manyanga; Shadreck Chirikure. Bameda : Langaa, 2017. p. 399-417.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Harvard

Sinamai, A 2017, Myth as Metaphors: Understanding Narratives in Sustaining sacred landscapes in Zimbabwe and Australia. in M Manyanga & S Chirikure (eds), Archives, Objects, Places and Landscapes: Multidisciplinary approaches to Decolonised Zimbabwean pasts. Langaa, Bameda, pp. 399-417. <https://books.google.co.zw/books?id=VKusDgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false>

APA

Sinamai, A. (2017). Myth as Metaphors: Understanding Narratives in Sustaining sacred landscapes in Zimbabwe and Australia. In M. Manyanga, & S. Chirikure (Eds.), Archives, Objects, Places and Landscapes: Multidisciplinary approaches to Decolonised Zimbabwean pasts (pp. 399-417). Langaa. https://books.google.co.zw/books?id=VKusDgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

Vancouver

Sinamai A. Myth as Metaphors: Understanding Narratives in Sustaining sacred landscapes in Zimbabwe and Australia. In Manyanga M, Chirikure S, editors, Archives, Objects, Places and Landscapes: Multidisciplinary approaches to Decolonised Zimbabwean pasts. Bameda: Langaa. 2017. p. 399-417

Author

Sinamai, Ashton. / Myth as Metaphors : Understanding Narratives in Sustaining sacred landscapes in Zimbabwe and Australia. Archives, Objects, Places and Landscapes: Multidisciplinary approaches to Decolonised Zimbabwean pasts. editor / Munyaradzi Manyanga ; Shadreck Chirikure. Bameda : Langaa, 2017. pp. 399-417

Bibtex - Download

@inbook{9c23f595f4c54e83957bab360b9fb141,
title = "Myth as Metaphors: Understanding Narratives in Sustaining sacred landscapes in Zimbabwe and Australia",
abstract = "This paper argues that sustainability of heritage is not only based on the conservation work and other interventions that we carry out at heritage places, or in providing for communities that live near it. Sustainability is not only a physical effort but part of an ideology of the mind which is, in turn, is sustained through a {\textquoteleft}metaphor network{\textquoteright}, understood only by those who value and have a different understanding of the heritage places. Heritage practitioners cannot {\textquoteleft}preserve{\textquoteright} what is in the mind, and there is a need to understand how communities create a domain in which the physical and the abstract cannot be differentiated. The research attempts to deconstruct the cultural landscape and to understand how certain landscapes are sustainable, while others which may have the same values are neglected and therefore unsustainable. The paper argues that these myths and legends are in fact metaphors that communities use to empower the landscape to protect itself from desecration and remain sustainable. In this paper three World Heritage sites (two in Zimbabwe – Khami and Great Zimbabwe; and one in Australia – Uluru or Ayers{\textquoteright} Rock) are used to show how sites can acquire a personality but once that {\textquoteleft}personality{\textquoteright} is affected the landscape may become unsustainable and therefore difficult to preserve. ",
author = "Ashton Sinamai",
year = "2017",
month = apr,
day = "1",
language = "English",
isbn = "995-764-19-1",
pages = "399--417",
editor = "Munyaradzi Manyanga and Chirikure, {Shadreck }",
booktitle = "Archives, Objects, Places and Landscapes",
publisher = "Langaa",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - CHAP

T1 - Myth as Metaphors

T2 - Understanding Narratives in Sustaining sacred landscapes in Zimbabwe and Australia

AU - Sinamai, Ashton

PY - 2017/4/1

Y1 - 2017/4/1

N2 - This paper argues that sustainability of heritage is not only based on the conservation work and other interventions that we carry out at heritage places, or in providing for communities that live near it. Sustainability is not only a physical effort but part of an ideology of the mind which is, in turn, is sustained through a ‘metaphor network’, understood only by those who value and have a different understanding of the heritage places. Heritage practitioners cannot ‘preserve’ what is in the mind, and there is a need to understand how communities create a domain in which the physical and the abstract cannot be differentiated. The research attempts to deconstruct the cultural landscape and to understand how certain landscapes are sustainable, while others which may have the same values are neglected and therefore unsustainable. The paper argues that these myths and legends are in fact metaphors that communities use to empower the landscape to protect itself from desecration and remain sustainable. In this paper three World Heritage sites (two in Zimbabwe – Khami and Great Zimbabwe; and one in Australia – Uluru or Ayers’ Rock) are used to show how sites can acquire a personality but once that ‘personality’ is affected the landscape may become unsustainable and therefore difficult to preserve.

AB - This paper argues that sustainability of heritage is not only based on the conservation work and other interventions that we carry out at heritage places, or in providing for communities that live near it. Sustainability is not only a physical effort but part of an ideology of the mind which is, in turn, is sustained through a ‘metaphor network’, understood only by those who value and have a different understanding of the heritage places. Heritage practitioners cannot ‘preserve’ what is in the mind, and there is a need to understand how communities create a domain in which the physical and the abstract cannot be differentiated. The research attempts to deconstruct the cultural landscape and to understand how certain landscapes are sustainable, while others which may have the same values are neglected and therefore unsustainable. The paper argues that these myths and legends are in fact metaphors that communities use to empower the landscape to protect itself from desecration and remain sustainable. In this paper three World Heritage sites (two in Zimbabwe – Khami and Great Zimbabwe; and one in Australia – Uluru or Ayers’ Rock) are used to show how sites can acquire a personality but once that ‘personality’ is affected the landscape may become unsustainable and therefore difficult to preserve.

M3 - Chapter (peer-reviewed)

SN - 995-764-19-1

SP - 399

EP - 417

BT - Archives, Objects, Places and Landscapes

A2 - Manyanga, Munyaradzi

A2 - Chirikure, Shadreck

PB - Langaa

CY - Bameda

ER -