Oral interactions in English secondary science classrooms: a grounded approach to identifying feedback types and practices

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Oral interactions in English secondary science classrooms: a grounded approach to identifying feedback types and practices. / Campbell-Mapplebeck, Andrea L; Dunlop, Lynda.

In: Research In Science Education, 08.05.2019, p. 1-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Campbell-Mapplebeck, AL & Dunlop, L 2019, 'Oral interactions in English secondary science classrooms: a grounded approach to identifying feedback types and practices', Research In Science Education, pp. 1-26. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11165-019-9843-y

APA

Campbell-Mapplebeck, A. L., & Dunlop, L. (2019). Oral interactions in English secondary science classrooms: a grounded approach to identifying feedback types and practices. Research In Science Education, 1-26. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11165-019-9843-y

Vancouver

Campbell-Mapplebeck AL, Dunlop L. Oral interactions in English secondary science classrooms: a grounded approach to identifying feedback types and practices. Research In Science Education. 2019 May 8;1-26. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11165-019-9843-y

Author

Campbell-Mapplebeck, Andrea L ; Dunlop, Lynda. / Oral interactions in English secondary science classrooms: a grounded approach to identifying feedback types and practices. In: Research In Science Education. 2019 ; pp. 1-26.

Bibtex - Download

@article{7949a8a3c7434dbbabb2815fe55f5ce0,
title = "Oral interactions in English secondary science classrooms: a grounded approach to identifying feedback types and practices",
abstract = "Feedback is an important practice in promoting learning. This study examines teachers’ oral feedback practices, with an analysis grounded in students’ perceptions of what helps them learn. Based on 38 hours of lesson observations, interviews with 10 teachers and 84 students, we identify how teachers conceptualise and practice oral feedback. Three main types of oral interaction are found to constitute feedback: discrepancy and success criteria comments and open questions. These are infrequently used by science teachers. We use findings to elaborate an ideal typical model of feedback practices. The study concludes with implications for practice in teaching and teacher education.",
author = "Campbell-Mapplebeck, {Andrea L} and Lynda Dunlop",
note = "{\circledC} The Author(s) 2019.",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "8",
doi = "10.1007/s11165-019-9843-y",
language = "English",
pages = "1--26",
journal = "Research In Science Education",
issn = "0157-244X",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oral interactions in English secondary science classrooms: a grounded approach to identifying feedback types and practices

AU - Campbell-Mapplebeck, Andrea L

AU - Dunlop, Lynda

N1 - © The Author(s) 2019.

PY - 2019/5/8

Y1 - 2019/5/8

N2 - Feedback is an important practice in promoting learning. This study examines teachers’ oral feedback practices, with an analysis grounded in students’ perceptions of what helps them learn. Based on 38 hours of lesson observations, interviews with 10 teachers and 84 students, we identify how teachers conceptualise and practice oral feedback. Three main types of oral interaction are found to constitute feedback: discrepancy and success criteria comments and open questions. These are infrequently used by science teachers. We use findings to elaborate an ideal typical model of feedback practices. The study concludes with implications for practice in teaching and teacher education.

AB - Feedback is an important practice in promoting learning. This study examines teachers’ oral feedback practices, with an analysis grounded in students’ perceptions of what helps them learn. Based on 38 hours of lesson observations, interviews with 10 teachers and 84 students, we identify how teachers conceptualise and practice oral feedback. Three main types of oral interaction are found to constitute feedback: discrepancy and success criteria comments and open questions. These are infrequently used by science teachers. We use findings to elaborate an ideal typical model of feedback practices. The study concludes with implications for practice in teaching and teacher education.

U2 - 10.1007/s11165-019-9843-y

DO - 10.1007/s11165-019-9843-y

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 26

JO - Research In Science Education

T2 - Research In Science Education

JF - Research In Science Education

SN - 0157-244X

ER -