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Pinus pinaster early hormonal defence responses to pinewood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) infection

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Pinus pinaster early hormonal defence responses to pinewood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) infection. / Rodrigues, Ana M.; Langer, Swen; Carrasquinho, Isabel; Bergström, Ed; Larson, Tony; Thomas-Oates, Jane; António, Carla.

In: Metabolites, Vol. 11, No. 4, 227, 08.04.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Rodrigues, AM, Langer, S, Carrasquinho, I, Bergström, E, Larson, T, Thomas-Oates, J & António, C 2021, 'Pinus pinaster early hormonal defence responses to pinewood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) infection', Metabolites, vol. 11, no. 4, 227. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11040227

APA

Rodrigues, A. M., Langer, S., Carrasquinho, I., Bergström, E., Larson, T., Thomas-Oates, J., & António, C. (2021). Pinus pinaster early hormonal defence responses to pinewood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) infection. Metabolites, 11(4), [227]. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11040227

Vancouver

Rodrigues AM, Langer S, Carrasquinho I, Bergström E, Larson T, Thomas-Oates J et al. Pinus pinaster early hormonal defence responses to pinewood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) infection. Metabolites. 2021 Apr 8;11(4). 227. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11040227

Author

Rodrigues, Ana M. ; Langer, Swen ; Carrasquinho, Isabel ; Bergström, Ed ; Larson, Tony ; Thomas-Oates, Jane ; António, Carla. / Pinus pinaster early hormonal defence responses to pinewood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) infection. In: Metabolites. 2021 ; Vol. 11, No. 4.

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@article{def8d4f3bacf46d98f4c336ebc38df18,
title = "Pinus pinaster early hormonal defence responses to pinewood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) infection",
abstract = "The pinewood nematode (PWN) is the causal agent of pine wilt disease, a pathology that affects conifer forests, mainly Pinus spp. PWN infection can induce the expression of phytohormone-related genes; however, changes at the early phytohormone level have not yet been explored. Phyto-hormones are low-abundance metabolites, and thus, difficult to quantify. Moreover, most method-ologies focus mainly on Arabidopsis or crop species. This work aimed to validate a fast (run time 6.6 min) liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (LC-QqQ-MS/MS) analytical method to quantify 14 phytohormones in Pinus pinaster stem tissues. This method was further applied to evaluate, for the first time, early phytohormone changes in susceptible and resistant phenotypes of P. pinaster 24, 48 and 72 h after inoculation (HAI) with PWN. A significant increase in salicylic acid (SA, 48 and 72 HAI) and jasmonic acid methyl ester (JA-ME, 72 HAI) was observed in susceptible phenotypes. Results indicate that the higher susceptibility of P. pinaster to PWN infection might result from an inefficient trigger of hypersensitive responses, with the involvement of JA and SA pathways. This work provides an important update in forest research, and adds to the current knowledge of Pinus spp. defence responses to PWN infection.",
keywords = "Analytical method validation, Biotic stress, Forest tree metabolomics, Maritime pine, Mass spectrometry (MS), Phytohormones, Pine wilt disease, Plant metabolomics, Quantitative MS, Triple quadrupole",
author = "Rodrigues, {Ana M.} and Swen Langer and Isabel Carrasquinho and Ed Bergstr{\"o}m and Tony Larson and Jane Thomas-Oates and Carla Ant{\'o}nio",
note = "Funding Information: Acknowledgments: The authors gratefully acknowledge Lurdes In{\'a}cio (Nematology Laboratory, INIAV, Portugal) for the virulent B. xylophilus inoculum, Hugo Monteiro (ITQB NOVA, Portugal) for greenhouse support, and David Harvey (CNAP, University of York, UK) for LC-MS technical support. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from Ana Milhinhos and In{\^e}s Chaves (ForGen Lab, FCUL, Portugal) during the inoculation procedure. Funding Information: Funding: This work was supported by national funds from Funda{\c c}{\~a}o para a Ci{\^e}ncia e Tecnologia (FCT) through the FCT Investigator Programme (C.A. contract IF/00376/2012/CP0165/CT0003), and the R&D unit GREEN-IT {\textquoteleft}Bioresources for sustainability{\textquoteright} (UID/Multi/04551/2013). A.M.R. acknowledges FCT and the ITQB NOVA International PhD Programme {\textquoteleft}Plants for Life{\textquoteright} (PD/00035/2013) for the PhD fellowship (PD/BD/114417/2016), and FEBS for the short-term fellowship award. I.C. acknowledges the FCT-funded project number 02/SAICT/2017. The York Centre of Excellence in Mass Spectrometry was created thanks to a major capital investment through Science City York, supported by Yorkshire Forward with funds from the Northern Way Initiative, and subsequent support from EPSRC (EP/K039660/1; EP/M028127/1). Funding Information: This work was supported by national funds from Funda??o para a Ci?ncia e Tecnologia (FCT) through the FCT Investigator Programme (C.A. contract IF/00376/2012/CP0165/CT0003), and the R&D unit GREEN-IT ?Bioresources for sustainability? (UID/Multi/04551/2013). A.M.R. acknowledges FCT and the ITQB NOVA International PhD Programme ?Plants for Life? (PD/00035/2013) for the PhD fellowship (PD/BD/114417/2016), and FEBS for the short-term fellowship award. I.C. acknowledges the FCT-funded project number 02/SAICT/2017. The York Centre of Excellence in Mass Spectrometry was created thanks to a major capital investment through Science City York, supported by Yorkshire Forward with funds from the Northern Way Initiative, and subsequent support from EPSRC (EP/K039660/1; EP/M028127/1). The authors gratefully acknowledge Lurdes In?cio (Nematology Laboratory, INIAV, Portugal) for the virulent B. xylophilus inoculum, Hugo Monteiro (ITQB NOVA, Portugal) for greenhouse support, and David Harvey (CNAP, University of York, UK) for LC-MS technical support. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from Ana Milhinhos and In?s Chaves (ForGen Lab, FCUL, Portugal) during the inoculation procedure. Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. ",
year = "2021",
month = apr,
day = "8",
doi = "10.3390/metabo11040227",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "Metabolites",
issn = "2218-1989",
publisher = "MDPI Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute",
number = "4",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Pinus pinaster early hormonal defence responses to pinewood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) infection

AU - Rodrigues, Ana M.

AU - Langer, Swen

AU - Carrasquinho, Isabel

AU - Bergström, Ed

AU - Larson, Tony

AU - Thomas-Oates, Jane

AU - António, Carla

N1 - Funding Information: Acknowledgments: The authors gratefully acknowledge Lurdes Inácio (Nematology Laboratory, INIAV, Portugal) for the virulent B. xylophilus inoculum, Hugo Monteiro (ITQB NOVA, Portugal) for greenhouse support, and David Harvey (CNAP, University of York, UK) for LC-MS technical support. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from Ana Milhinhos and Inês Chaves (ForGen Lab, FCUL, Portugal) during the inoculation procedure. Funding Information: Funding: This work was supported by national funds from Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia (FCT) through the FCT Investigator Programme (C.A. contract IF/00376/2012/CP0165/CT0003), and the R&D unit GREEN-IT ‘Bioresources for sustainability’ (UID/Multi/04551/2013). A.M.R. acknowledges FCT and the ITQB NOVA International PhD Programme ‘Plants for Life’ (PD/00035/2013) for the PhD fellowship (PD/BD/114417/2016), and FEBS for the short-term fellowship award. I.C. acknowledges the FCT-funded project number 02/SAICT/2017. The York Centre of Excellence in Mass Spectrometry was created thanks to a major capital investment through Science City York, supported by Yorkshire Forward with funds from the Northern Way Initiative, and subsequent support from EPSRC (EP/K039660/1; EP/M028127/1). Funding Information: This work was supported by national funds from Funda??o para a Ci?ncia e Tecnologia (FCT) through the FCT Investigator Programme (C.A. contract IF/00376/2012/CP0165/CT0003), and the R&D unit GREEN-IT ?Bioresources for sustainability? (UID/Multi/04551/2013). A.M.R. acknowledges FCT and the ITQB NOVA International PhD Programme ?Plants for Life? (PD/00035/2013) for the PhD fellowship (PD/BD/114417/2016), and FEBS for the short-term fellowship award. I.C. acknowledges the FCT-funded project number 02/SAICT/2017. The York Centre of Excellence in Mass Spectrometry was created thanks to a major capital investment through Science City York, supported by Yorkshire Forward with funds from the Northern Way Initiative, and subsequent support from EPSRC (EP/K039660/1; EP/M028127/1). The authors gratefully acknowledge Lurdes In?cio (Nematology Laboratory, INIAV, Portugal) for the virulent B. xylophilus inoculum, Hugo Monteiro (ITQB NOVA, Portugal) for greenhouse support, and David Harvey (CNAP, University of York, UK) for LC-MS technical support. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from Ana Milhinhos and In?s Chaves (ForGen Lab, FCUL, Portugal) during the inoculation procedure. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

PY - 2021/4/8

Y1 - 2021/4/8

N2 - The pinewood nematode (PWN) is the causal agent of pine wilt disease, a pathology that affects conifer forests, mainly Pinus spp. PWN infection can induce the expression of phytohormone-related genes; however, changes at the early phytohormone level have not yet been explored. Phyto-hormones are low-abundance metabolites, and thus, difficult to quantify. Moreover, most method-ologies focus mainly on Arabidopsis or crop species. This work aimed to validate a fast (run time 6.6 min) liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (LC-QqQ-MS/MS) analytical method to quantify 14 phytohormones in Pinus pinaster stem tissues. This method was further applied to evaluate, for the first time, early phytohormone changes in susceptible and resistant phenotypes of P. pinaster 24, 48 and 72 h after inoculation (HAI) with PWN. A significant increase in salicylic acid (SA, 48 and 72 HAI) and jasmonic acid methyl ester (JA-ME, 72 HAI) was observed in susceptible phenotypes. Results indicate that the higher susceptibility of P. pinaster to PWN infection might result from an inefficient trigger of hypersensitive responses, with the involvement of JA and SA pathways. This work provides an important update in forest research, and adds to the current knowledge of Pinus spp. defence responses to PWN infection.

AB - The pinewood nematode (PWN) is the causal agent of pine wilt disease, a pathology that affects conifer forests, mainly Pinus spp. PWN infection can induce the expression of phytohormone-related genes; however, changes at the early phytohormone level have not yet been explored. Phyto-hormones are low-abundance metabolites, and thus, difficult to quantify. Moreover, most method-ologies focus mainly on Arabidopsis or crop species. This work aimed to validate a fast (run time 6.6 min) liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (LC-QqQ-MS/MS) analytical method to quantify 14 phytohormones in Pinus pinaster stem tissues. This method was further applied to evaluate, for the first time, early phytohormone changes in susceptible and resistant phenotypes of P. pinaster 24, 48 and 72 h after inoculation (HAI) with PWN. A significant increase in salicylic acid (SA, 48 and 72 HAI) and jasmonic acid methyl ester (JA-ME, 72 HAI) was observed in susceptible phenotypes. Results indicate that the higher susceptibility of P. pinaster to PWN infection might result from an inefficient trigger of hypersensitive responses, with the involvement of JA and SA pathways. This work provides an important update in forest research, and adds to the current knowledge of Pinus spp. defence responses to PWN infection.

KW - Analytical method validation

KW - Biotic stress

KW - Forest tree metabolomics

KW - Maritime pine

KW - Mass spectrometry (MS)

KW - Phytohormones

KW - Pine wilt disease

KW - Plant metabolomics

KW - Quantitative MS

KW - Triple quadrupole

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85104362744&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/metabo11040227

DO - 10.3390/metabo11040227

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85104362744

VL - 11

JO - Metabolites

JF - Metabolites

SN - 2218-1989

IS - 4

M1 - 227

ER -