By the same authors

From the same journal

From the same journal

From the same journal

Places of sanctuary for ‘the undeserving’? Homeless people’s day centres and the problem of conditionality

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

Places of sanctuary for ‘the undeserving’? Homeless people’s day centres and the problem of conditionality. / Dwyer, Peter James; Bowpitt, Graham; Weinstein, Mark; Sundin, Eva.

In: British Journal of Social Work, Vol. n/a, No. n/a, 2013, p. 1-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Dwyer, PJ, Bowpitt, G, Weinstein, M & Sundin, E 2013, 'Places of sanctuary for ‘the undeserving’? Homeless people’s day centres and the problem of conditionality', British Journal of Social Work, vol. n/a, no. n/a, pp. 1-17. https://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcs196

APA

Dwyer, P. J., Bowpitt, G., Weinstein, M., & Sundin, E. (2013). Places of sanctuary for ‘the undeserving’? Homeless people’s day centres and the problem of conditionality. British Journal of Social Work, n/a(n/a), 1-17. https://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcs196

Vancouver

Dwyer PJ, Bowpitt G, Weinstein M, Sundin E. Places of sanctuary for ‘the undeserving’? Homeless people’s day centres and the problem of conditionality. British Journal of Social Work. 2013;n/a(n/a):1-17. https://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcs196

Author

Dwyer, Peter James ; Bowpitt, Graham ; Weinstein, Mark ; Sundin, Eva. / Places of sanctuary for ‘the undeserving’? Homeless people’s day centres and the problem of conditionality. In: British Journal of Social Work. 2013 ; Vol. n/a, No. n/a. pp. 1-17.

Bibtex - Download

@article{295cf7995dca46189adec623685cd7ea,
title = "Places of sanctuary for {\textquoteleft}the undeserving{\textquoteright}? Homeless people{\textquoteright}s day centres and the problem of conditionality",
abstract = "This paper is an exploration of a dilemma that is central to the place of day centres in tackling single homelessness and raises issues for social work more generally. On the one hand, day centres provide vital services to a vulnerable group in a safe, non-threatening and non-judgemental setting; on the other hand, in doing so, they are believed to impede opportunities for personal change. The paper draws on findings from a research study which compared and contrasted the priorities of single homeless people with multiple support needs with the priorities of support services, exploring the role of encounters between service users and agencies in either overcoming or reinforcing multiple exclusion homelessness. This paper focuses on evidence about the use of day centres. It seeks to draw on theological insights to explore day centres as {\textquoteleft}places of sanctuary{\textquoteright} whose largely unconditional accessibility enables them to serve as both a last refuge for the victims of multiple rejection and a safe place to confront the past. This paper will take the debate about conditionality in welfare provision beyond the field of homelessness to address one of the oldest dilemmas of social work: how to facilitate change while respecting people's free agency. ",
author = "Dwyer, {Peter James} and Graham Bowpitt and Mark Weinstein and Eva Sundin",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1093/bjsw/bcs196",
language = "English",
volume = "n/a",
pages = "1--17",
journal = "British Journal of Social Work",
issn = "1468-263X",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "n/a",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Places of sanctuary for ‘the undeserving’? Homeless people’s day centres and the problem of conditionality

AU - Dwyer, Peter James

AU - Bowpitt, Graham

AU - Weinstein, Mark

AU - Sundin, Eva

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - This paper is an exploration of a dilemma that is central to the place of day centres in tackling single homelessness and raises issues for social work more generally. On the one hand, day centres provide vital services to a vulnerable group in a safe, non-threatening and non-judgemental setting; on the other hand, in doing so, they are believed to impede opportunities for personal change. The paper draws on findings from a research study which compared and contrasted the priorities of single homeless people with multiple support needs with the priorities of support services, exploring the role of encounters between service users and agencies in either overcoming or reinforcing multiple exclusion homelessness. This paper focuses on evidence about the use of day centres. It seeks to draw on theological insights to explore day centres as ‘places of sanctuary’ whose largely unconditional accessibility enables them to serve as both a last refuge for the victims of multiple rejection and a safe place to confront the past. This paper will take the debate about conditionality in welfare provision beyond the field of homelessness to address one of the oldest dilemmas of social work: how to facilitate change while respecting people's free agency.

AB - This paper is an exploration of a dilemma that is central to the place of day centres in tackling single homelessness and raises issues for social work more generally. On the one hand, day centres provide vital services to a vulnerable group in a safe, non-threatening and non-judgemental setting; on the other hand, in doing so, they are believed to impede opportunities for personal change. The paper draws on findings from a research study which compared and contrasted the priorities of single homeless people with multiple support needs with the priorities of support services, exploring the role of encounters between service users and agencies in either overcoming or reinforcing multiple exclusion homelessness. This paper focuses on evidence about the use of day centres. It seeks to draw on theological insights to explore day centres as ‘places of sanctuary’ whose largely unconditional accessibility enables them to serve as both a last refuge for the victims of multiple rejection and a safe place to confront the past. This paper will take the debate about conditionality in welfare provision beyond the field of homelessness to address one of the oldest dilemmas of social work: how to facilitate change while respecting people's free agency.

U2 - 10.1093/bjsw/bcs196

DO - 10.1093/bjsw/bcs196

M3 - Article

VL - n/a

SP - 1

EP - 17

JO - British Journal of Social Work

JF - British Journal of Social Work

SN - 1468-263X

IS - n/a

ER -