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Politically acceptable poverty

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

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Politically acceptable poverty. / O'Brien, Charlotte Rachel.

In: Poverty, Vol. 149, 2014, p. 15-17.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Harvard

O'Brien, CR 2014, 'Politically acceptable poverty' Poverty, vol. 149, pp. 15-17. <http://www.cpag.org.uk/sites/default/files/CPAG-Poverty-politically-acceptable-poverty-Oct-2014.pdf>

APA

O'Brien, C. R. (2014). Politically acceptable poverty. Poverty, 149, 15-17. http://www.cpag.org.uk/sites/default/files/CPAG-Poverty-politically-acceptable-poverty-Oct-2014.pdf

Vancouver

O'Brien CR. Politically acceptable poverty. Poverty. 2014;149:15-17.

Author

O'Brien, Charlotte Rachel. / Politically acceptable poverty. In: Poverty. 2014 ; Vol. 149. pp. 15-17.

Bibtex - Download

@misc{f866f5a32897412c9a4e87bf78a9abbd,
title = "Politically acceptable poverty",
abstract = "In the current popular discourse the media and the government have positioned migrants from the European Union (EU) as welfare threats and, despite the evidence that they are net contributors to the economy, as acceptable targets for welfare reform.In addition to the stream of new rules reducing their entitlement, EU migrants also face a host of hidden administrative obstacles, impairing their access to welfare benefits to which they are entitled under EU law. Challenging these obstacles may not be politically popular but, given the vilification of a vulnerable demographic, the need to do so is pressing. Charlotte O{\textquoteright}Brien describes the work of a new project that hopes to increase EU migrants{\textquoteright} access to justice.",
author = "O'Brien, {Charlotte Rachel}",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
volume = "149",
pages = "15--17",
journal = "Poverty",
issn = "0032-5856",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - GEN

T1 - Politically acceptable poverty

AU - O'Brien, Charlotte Rachel

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - In the current popular discourse the media and the government have positioned migrants from the European Union (EU) as welfare threats and, despite the evidence that they are net contributors to the economy, as acceptable targets for welfare reform.In addition to the stream of new rules reducing their entitlement, EU migrants also face a host of hidden administrative obstacles, impairing their access to welfare benefits to which they are entitled under EU law. Challenging these obstacles may not be politically popular but, given the vilification of a vulnerable demographic, the need to do so is pressing. Charlotte O’Brien describes the work of a new project that hopes to increase EU migrants’ access to justice.

AB - In the current popular discourse the media and the government have positioned migrants from the European Union (EU) as welfare threats and, despite the evidence that they are net contributors to the economy, as acceptable targets for welfare reform.In addition to the stream of new rules reducing their entitlement, EU migrants also face a host of hidden administrative obstacles, impairing their access to welfare benefits to which they are entitled under EU law. Challenging these obstacles may not be politically popular but, given the vilification of a vulnerable demographic, the need to do so is pressing. Charlotte O’Brien describes the work of a new project that hopes to increase EU migrants’ access to justice.

M3 - Article

VL - 149

SP - 15

EP - 17

JO - Poverty

JF - Poverty

SN - 0032-5856

ER -