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Predicting performance on academic and non-academic tasks: A comparison of adolescents with and without learning disabilities

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Predicting performance on academic and non-academic tasks : A comparison of adolescents with and without learning disabilities. / Job, Jenelle M.; Klassen, Robert M.

In: Contemporary Educational Psychology, Vol. 37, No. 2, 04.2012, p. 162-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Job, JM & Klassen, RM 2012, 'Predicting performance on academic and non-academic tasks: A comparison of adolescents with and without learning disabilities', Contemporary Educational Psychology, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 162-169. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2011.05.001

APA

Job, J. M., & Klassen, R. M. (2012). Predicting performance on academic and non-academic tasks: A comparison of adolescents with and without learning disabilities. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 37(2), 162-169. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2011.05.001

Vancouver

Job JM, Klassen RM. Predicting performance on academic and non-academic tasks: A comparison of adolescents with and without learning disabilities. Contemporary Educational Psychology. 2012 Apr;37(2):162-169. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2011.05.001

Author

Job, Jenelle M. ; Klassen, Robert M. / Predicting performance on academic and non-academic tasks : A comparison of adolescents with and without learning disabilities. In: Contemporary Educational Psychology. 2012 ; Vol. 37, No. 2. pp. 162-169.

Bibtex - Download

@article{19401783e11549988d73b38b396bb447,
title = "Predicting performance on academic and non-academic tasks: A comparison of adolescents with and without learning disabilities",
abstract = "Previous research suggests that adolescents with learning disabilities (LD) are less accurate in predicting academic performance than normally achieving (NA) adolescents and display a tendency to overestimate their level of performance (e.g., Klassen, 2007). However, no studies have been conducted investigating whether this overestimation is specific to academic contexts or a phenomenon that extends across domains. Ninety-four adolescents (46 LD, 48 NA) predicted their performance on a spelling task and on a ball-throwing task. Results revealed group differences in performance calibration across domains with adolescents with LD showing an overestimation of ability on the spelling and ball-throwing tasks, and NA adolescents demonstrating more precise self-appraisals. Additionally, the accuracy of non-academic performance predictions remained stable with increasing difficulty in the NA group whereas the adolescents with LD demonstrated a decrease in accurate performance prediction as the difficulty level increased. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
author = "Job, {Jenelle M.} and Klassen, {Robert M.}",
year = "2012",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1016/j.cedpsych.2011.05.001",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
pages = "162--169",
journal = "Contemporary Educational Psychology",
issn = "0361-476X",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predicting performance on academic and non-academic tasks

T2 - A comparison of adolescents with and without learning disabilities

AU - Job, Jenelle M.

AU - Klassen, Robert M.

PY - 2012/4

Y1 - 2012/4

N2 - Previous research suggests that adolescents with learning disabilities (LD) are less accurate in predicting academic performance than normally achieving (NA) adolescents and display a tendency to overestimate their level of performance (e.g., Klassen, 2007). However, no studies have been conducted investigating whether this overestimation is specific to academic contexts or a phenomenon that extends across domains. Ninety-four adolescents (46 LD, 48 NA) predicted their performance on a spelling task and on a ball-throwing task. Results revealed group differences in performance calibration across domains with adolescents with LD showing an overestimation of ability on the spelling and ball-throwing tasks, and NA adolescents demonstrating more precise self-appraisals. Additionally, the accuracy of non-academic performance predictions remained stable with increasing difficulty in the NA group whereas the adolescents with LD demonstrated a decrease in accurate performance prediction as the difficulty level increased. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

AB - Previous research suggests that adolescents with learning disabilities (LD) are less accurate in predicting academic performance than normally achieving (NA) adolescents and display a tendency to overestimate their level of performance (e.g., Klassen, 2007). However, no studies have been conducted investigating whether this overestimation is specific to academic contexts or a phenomenon that extends across domains. Ninety-four adolescents (46 LD, 48 NA) predicted their performance on a spelling task and on a ball-throwing task. Results revealed group differences in performance calibration across domains with adolescents with LD showing an overestimation of ability on the spelling and ball-throwing tasks, and NA adolescents demonstrating more precise self-appraisals. Additionally, the accuracy of non-academic performance predictions remained stable with increasing difficulty in the NA group whereas the adolescents with LD demonstrated a decrease in accurate performance prediction as the difficulty level increased. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84858157330&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.cedpsych.2011.05.001

DO - 10.1016/j.cedpsych.2011.05.001

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 162

EP - 169

JO - Contemporary Educational Psychology

JF - Contemporary Educational Psychology

SN - 0361-476X

IS - 2

ER -