By the same authors

From the same journal

From the same journal

Protected area networks and savannah bird biodiversity in the face of climate change and land degradation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Protected area networks and savannah bird biodiversity in the face of climate change and land degradation. / Beale, C.M.; Baker, N.E.; Brewer, M.J.; Lennon, J.J.

In: Ecology Letters, Vol. Early Online, No. n/a, 01.08.2013, p. n/a.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Beale, CM, Baker, NE, Brewer, MJ & Lennon, JJ 2013, 'Protected area networks and savannah bird biodiversity in the face of climate change and land degradation', Ecology Letters, vol. Early Online, no. n/a, pp. n/a. https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.12139

APA

Beale, C. M., Baker, N. E., Brewer, M. J., & Lennon, J. J. (2013). Protected area networks and savannah bird biodiversity in the face of climate change and land degradation. Ecology Letters, Early Online(n/a), n/a. https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.12139

Vancouver

Beale CM, Baker NE, Brewer MJ, Lennon JJ. Protected area networks and savannah bird biodiversity in the face of climate change and land degradation. Ecology Letters. 2013 Aug 1;Early Online(n/a):n/a. https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.12139

Author

Beale, C.M. ; Baker, N.E. ; Brewer, M.J. ; Lennon, J.J. / Protected area networks and savannah bird biodiversity in the face of climate change and land degradation. In: Ecology Letters. 2013 ; Vol. Early Online, No. n/a. pp. n/a.

Bibtex - Download

@article{5053d99592344e45a63a6accedc2a2c2,
title = "Protected area networks and savannah bird biodiversity in the face of climate change and land degradation",
abstract = "The extent to which climate change might diminish the efficacy of protected areas is one of the most pressing conservation questions. Many projections suggest that climate-driven species distribution shifts will leave protected areas impoverished and species inadequately protected while other evidence suggests that intact ecosystems within protected areas will be resilient to change. Here, we tackle this problem empirically. We show how recent changes in distribution of 139 Tanzanian savannah bird species are linked to climate change, protected area status and land degradation. We provide the first evidence of climate-driven range shifts for an African bird community. Our results suggest that the continued maintenance of existing protected areas is an appropriate conservation response to the challenge of climate and environmental change.",
author = "C.M. Beale and N.E. Baker and M.J. Brewer and J.J. Lennon",
year = "2013",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/ele.12139",
language = "English",
volume = "Early Online",
pages = "n/a",
journal = "Ecology Letters",
issn = "1461-023X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "n/a",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Protected area networks and savannah bird biodiversity in the face of climate change and land degradation

AU - Beale, C.M.

AU - Baker, N.E.

AU - Brewer, M.J.

AU - Lennon, J.J.

PY - 2013/8/1

Y1 - 2013/8/1

N2 - The extent to which climate change might diminish the efficacy of protected areas is one of the most pressing conservation questions. Many projections suggest that climate-driven species distribution shifts will leave protected areas impoverished and species inadequately protected while other evidence suggests that intact ecosystems within protected areas will be resilient to change. Here, we tackle this problem empirically. We show how recent changes in distribution of 139 Tanzanian savannah bird species are linked to climate change, protected area status and land degradation. We provide the first evidence of climate-driven range shifts for an African bird community. Our results suggest that the continued maintenance of existing protected areas is an appropriate conservation response to the challenge of climate and environmental change.

AB - The extent to which climate change might diminish the efficacy of protected areas is one of the most pressing conservation questions. Many projections suggest that climate-driven species distribution shifts will leave protected areas impoverished and species inadequately protected while other evidence suggests that intact ecosystems within protected areas will be resilient to change. Here, we tackle this problem empirically. We show how recent changes in distribution of 139 Tanzanian savannah bird species are linked to climate change, protected area status and land degradation. We provide the first evidence of climate-driven range shifts for an African bird community. Our results suggest that the continued maintenance of existing protected areas is an appropriate conservation response to the challenge of climate and environmental change.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84879041263&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/ele.12139

DO - 10.1111/ele.12139

M3 - Article

VL - Early Online

SP - n/a

JO - Ecology Letters

T2 - Ecology Letters

JF - Ecology Letters

SN - 1461-023X

IS - n/a

ER -