By the same authors

From the same journal

Quantifying and understanding carbon storage and sequestration within the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania, a tropical biodiversity hotspot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Quantifying and understanding carbon storage and sequestration within the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania, a tropical biodiversity hotspot. / Willcock, Simon; Phillips, Oliver L.; Platts, Philip J.; Balmford, Andrew; Burgess, Neil D.; Lovett, Jon C.; Ahrends, Antje; Bayliss, Julian; Doggart, Nike; Doody, Kathryn; Fanning, Eibleis; Green, Jonathan Michael Halsey; Hall, Jaclyn; Howell, Kim L.; Marchant, Rob; Marshall, Andrew R.; Mbilinyi, Boniface; Munishi, Pantaleon K T; Owen, Nisha; Swetnam, Ruth D.; Topp-Jorgensen, Elmer J.; Lewis, Simon L.

In: Carbon Balance and Management, Vol. 9, No. 1, 2, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Willcock, S, Phillips, OL, Platts, PJ, Balmford, A, Burgess, ND, Lovett, JC, Ahrends, A, Bayliss, J, Doggart, N, Doody, K, Fanning, E, Green, JMH, Hall, J, Howell, KL, Marchant, R, Marshall, AR, Mbilinyi, B, Munishi, PKT, Owen, N, Swetnam, RD, Topp-Jorgensen, EJ & Lewis, SL 2014, 'Quantifying and understanding carbon storage and sequestration within the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania, a tropical biodiversity hotspot', Carbon Balance and Management, vol. 9, no. 1, 2. https://doi.org/10.1186/1750-0680-9-2

APA

Willcock, S., Phillips, O. L., Platts, P. J., Balmford, A., Burgess, N. D., Lovett, J. C., ... Lewis, S. L. (2014). Quantifying and understanding carbon storage and sequestration within the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania, a tropical biodiversity hotspot. Carbon Balance and Management, 9(1), [2]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1750-0680-9-2

Vancouver

Willcock S, Phillips OL, Platts PJ, Balmford A, Burgess ND, Lovett JC et al. Quantifying and understanding carbon storage and sequestration within the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania, a tropical biodiversity hotspot. Carbon Balance and Management. 2014 Jan 1;9(1). 2. https://doi.org/10.1186/1750-0680-9-2

Author

Willcock, Simon ; Phillips, Oliver L. ; Platts, Philip J. ; Balmford, Andrew ; Burgess, Neil D. ; Lovett, Jon C. ; Ahrends, Antje ; Bayliss, Julian ; Doggart, Nike ; Doody, Kathryn ; Fanning, Eibleis ; Green, Jonathan Michael Halsey ; Hall, Jaclyn ; Howell, Kim L. ; Marchant, Rob ; Marshall, Andrew R. ; Mbilinyi, Boniface ; Munishi, Pantaleon K T ; Owen, Nisha ; Swetnam, Ruth D. ; Topp-Jorgensen, Elmer J. ; Lewis, Simon L. / Quantifying and understanding carbon storage and sequestration within the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania, a tropical biodiversity hotspot. In: Carbon Balance and Management. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.

Bibtex - Download

@article{7f1265c5162a4217a7c0395a04d0ecb6,
title = "Quantifying and understanding carbon storage and sequestration within the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania, a tropical biodiversity hotspot",
abstract = "Background: The carbon stored in vegetation varies across tropical landscapes due to a complex mix of climatic and edaphic variables, as well as direct human interventions such as deforestation and forest degradation. Mapping and monitoring this variation is essential if policy developments such as REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) are to be known to have succeeded or failed. Results: We produce a map of carbon storage across the watershed of the Tanzanian Eastern Arc Mountains (33.9 million ha) using 1,611 forest inventory plots, and correlations with associated climate, soil and disturbance data. As expected, tropical forest stores more carbon per hectare (182 Mg C ha-1) than woody savanna (51 Mg C ha-1). However, woody savanna is the largest aggregate carbon store, with 0.49 Pg C over 9.6 million ha. We estimate the whole landscape stores 1.3 Pg C, significantly higher than most previous estimates for the region. The 95{\%} Confidence Interval for this method (0.9 to 3.2 Pg C) is larger than simpler look-up table methods (1.5 to 1.6 Pg C), suggesting simpler methods may underestimate uncertainty. Using a small number of inventory plots with two censuses (n = 43) to assess changes in carbon storage, and applying the same mapping procedures, we found that carbon storage in the tree-dominated ecosystems has decreased, though not significantly, at a mean rate of 1.47 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 (c. 2{\%} of the stocks of carbon per year). Conclusions: The most influential variables on carbon storage in the region are anthropogenic, particularly historical logging, as noted by the largest coefficient of explanatory variable on the response variable. Of the non-anthropogenic factors, a negative correlation with air temperature and a positive correlation with water availability dominate, having smaller p-values than historical logging but also smaller influence. High carbon storage is typically found far from the commercial capital, in locations with a low monthly temperature range, without a strong dry season, and in areas that have not suffered from historical logging. The results imply that policy interventions could retain carbon stored in vegetation and likely successfully slow or reverse carbon emissions.",
keywords = "Degradation, Disturbance, Eastern Arc Mountains, Ecosystem service, Forest, IPCC Tier 3, REDD+, Tanzania",
author = "Simon Willcock and Phillips, {Oliver L.} and Platts, {Philip J.} and Andrew Balmford and Burgess, {Neil D.} and Lovett, {Jon C.} and Antje Ahrends and Julian Bayliss and Nike Doggart and Kathryn Doody and Eibleis Fanning and Green, {Jonathan Michael Halsey} and Jaclyn Hall and Howell, {Kim L.} and Rob Marchant and Marshall, {Andrew R.} and Boniface Mbilinyi and Munishi, {Pantaleon K T} and Nisha Owen and Swetnam, {Ruth D.} and Topp-Jorgensen, {Elmer J.} and Lewis, {Simon L.}",
note = "{\circledC} 2014 Willcock et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited.",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1186/1750-0680-9-2",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
journal = "Carbon Balance and Management",
issn = "1750-0680",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quantifying and understanding carbon storage and sequestration within the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania, a tropical biodiversity hotspot

AU - Willcock, Simon

AU - Phillips, Oliver L.

AU - Platts, Philip J.

AU - Balmford, Andrew

AU - Burgess, Neil D.

AU - Lovett, Jon C.

AU - Ahrends, Antje

AU - Bayliss, Julian

AU - Doggart, Nike

AU - Doody, Kathryn

AU - Fanning, Eibleis

AU - Green, Jonathan Michael Halsey

AU - Hall, Jaclyn

AU - Howell, Kim L.

AU - Marchant, Rob

AU - Marshall, Andrew R.

AU - Mbilinyi, Boniface

AU - Munishi, Pantaleon K T

AU - Owen, Nisha

AU - Swetnam, Ruth D.

AU - Topp-Jorgensen, Elmer J.

AU - Lewis, Simon L.

N1 - © 2014 Willcock et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Background: The carbon stored in vegetation varies across tropical landscapes due to a complex mix of climatic and edaphic variables, as well as direct human interventions such as deforestation and forest degradation. Mapping and monitoring this variation is essential if policy developments such as REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) are to be known to have succeeded or failed. Results: We produce a map of carbon storage across the watershed of the Tanzanian Eastern Arc Mountains (33.9 million ha) using 1,611 forest inventory plots, and correlations with associated climate, soil and disturbance data. As expected, tropical forest stores more carbon per hectare (182 Mg C ha-1) than woody savanna (51 Mg C ha-1). However, woody savanna is the largest aggregate carbon store, with 0.49 Pg C over 9.6 million ha. We estimate the whole landscape stores 1.3 Pg C, significantly higher than most previous estimates for the region. The 95% Confidence Interval for this method (0.9 to 3.2 Pg C) is larger than simpler look-up table methods (1.5 to 1.6 Pg C), suggesting simpler methods may underestimate uncertainty. Using a small number of inventory plots with two censuses (n = 43) to assess changes in carbon storage, and applying the same mapping procedures, we found that carbon storage in the tree-dominated ecosystems has decreased, though not significantly, at a mean rate of 1.47 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 (c. 2% of the stocks of carbon per year). Conclusions: The most influential variables on carbon storage in the region are anthropogenic, particularly historical logging, as noted by the largest coefficient of explanatory variable on the response variable. Of the non-anthropogenic factors, a negative correlation with air temperature and a positive correlation with water availability dominate, having smaller p-values than historical logging but also smaller influence. High carbon storage is typically found far from the commercial capital, in locations with a low monthly temperature range, without a strong dry season, and in areas that have not suffered from historical logging. The results imply that policy interventions could retain carbon stored in vegetation and likely successfully slow or reverse carbon emissions.

AB - Background: The carbon stored in vegetation varies across tropical landscapes due to a complex mix of climatic and edaphic variables, as well as direct human interventions such as deforestation and forest degradation. Mapping and monitoring this variation is essential if policy developments such as REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) are to be known to have succeeded or failed. Results: We produce a map of carbon storage across the watershed of the Tanzanian Eastern Arc Mountains (33.9 million ha) using 1,611 forest inventory plots, and correlations with associated climate, soil and disturbance data. As expected, tropical forest stores more carbon per hectare (182 Mg C ha-1) than woody savanna (51 Mg C ha-1). However, woody savanna is the largest aggregate carbon store, with 0.49 Pg C over 9.6 million ha. We estimate the whole landscape stores 1.3 Pg C, significantly higher than most previous estimates for the region. The 95% Confidence Interval for this method (0.9 to 3.2 Pg C) is larger than simpler look-up table methods (1.5 to 1.6 Pg C), suggesting simpler methods may underestimate uncertainty. Using a small number of inventory plots with two censuses (n = 43) to assess changes in carbon storage, and applying the same mapping procedures, we found that carbon storage in the tree-dominated ecosystems has decreased, though not significantly, at a mean rate of 1.47 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 (c. 2% of the stocks of carbon per year). Conclusions: The most influential variables on carbon storage in the region are anthropogenic, particularly historical logging, as noted by the largest coefficient of explanatory variable on the response variable. Of the non-anthropogenic factors, a negative correlation with air temperature and a positive correlation with water availability dominate, having smaller p-values than historical logging but also smaller influence. High carbon storage is typically found far from the commercial capital, in locations with a low monthly temperature range, without a strong dry season, and in areas that have not suffered from historical logging. The results imply that policy interventions could retain carbon stored in vegetation and likely successfully slow or reverse carbon emissions.

KW - Degradation

KW - Disturbance

KW - Eastern Arc Mountains

KW - Ecosystem service

KW - Forest

KW - IPCC Tier 3

KW - REDD+

KW - Tanzania

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84928546625&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/1750-0680-9-2

DO - 10.1186/1750-0680-9-2

M3 - Article

VL - 9

JO - Carbon Balance and Management

JF - Carbon Balance and Management

SN - 1750-0680

IS - 1

M1 - 2

ER -