By the same authors

From the same journal

Recruiting and Retaining Participants in Citizen Science: What Can Be Learned from the Volunteering Literature?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Recruiting and Retaining Participants in Citizen Science: What Can Be Learned from the Volunteering Literature? / West, Sarah Elizabeth; Pateman, Rachel Mary.

In: Citizen Science: Theory and Practice, Vol. 1, No. 2, 31.12.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

West, SE & Pateman, RM 2016, 'Recruiting and Retaining Participants in Citizen Science: What Can Be Learned from the Volunteering Literature?', Citizen Science: Theory and Practice, vol. 1, no. 2. https://doi.org/10.5334/cstp.8

APA

West, S. E., & Pateman, R. M. (2016). Recruiting and Retaining Participants in Citizen Science: What Can Be Learned from the Volunteering Literature? Citizen Science: Theory and Practice, 1(2). https://doi.org/10.5334/cstp.8

Vancouver

West SE, Pateman RM. Recruiting and Retaining Participants in Citizen Science: What Can Be Learned from the Volunteering Literature? Citizen Science: Theory and Practice. 2016 Dec 31;1(2). https://doi.org/10.5334/cstp.8

Author

West, Sarah Elizabeth ; Pateman, Rachel Mary. / Recruiting and Retaining Participants in Citizen Science: What Can Be Learned from the Volunteering Literature?. In: Citizen Science: Theory and Practice. 2016 ; Vol. 1, No. 2.

Bibtex - Download

@article{e389276286104bf3b9fbb3b64b79fb2c,
title = "Recruiting and Retaining Participants in Citizen Science: What Can Be Learned from the Volunteering Literature?",
abstract = "New citizen science projects are emerging all the time as scientists, policy-makers, and non-governmental organisations see the value of conducting research in this way. Understanding what factors influence people to take part in citizen science projects and why participants continue their involvement are important questions for the field. Here, we bring together key theories from the volunteering literature with examples from the environmental volunteering and citizen science literature to describe the factors that influence people to start and continue participating in citizen science projects. Good project organisation is key, and project organisers need to consider potential participants{\textquoteright} motivations; their personal attributes, circumstances and demographics; and how they will become aware of the opportunity. We discuss each of these factors with reference to both the academic and the grey (non-academic) literature, and based on this make general recommendations for those designing and running citizen science projects. ",
author = "West, {Sarah Elizabeth} and Pateman, {Rachel Mary}",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2016 The Author(s).",
year = "2016",
month = dec,
day = "31",
doi = "10.5334/cstp.8",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
journal = "Citizen Science: Theory and Practice",
issn = "2057-4991",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Recruiting and Retaining Participants in Citizen Science: What Can Be Learned from the Volunteering Literature?

AU - West, Sarah Elizabeth

AU - Pateman, Rachel Mary

N1 - © 2016 The Author(s).

PY - 2016/12/31

Y1 - 2016/12/31

N2 - New citizen science projects are emerging all the time as scientists, policy-makers, and non-governmental organisations see the value of conducting research in this way. Understanding what factors influence people to take part in citizen science projects and why participants continue their involvement are important questions for the field. Here, we bring together key theories from the volunteering literature with examples from the environmental volunteering and citizen science literature to describe the factors that influence people to start and continue participating in citizen science projects. Good project organisation is key, and project organisers need to consider potential participants’ motivations; their personal attributes, circumstances and demographics; and how they will become aware of the opportunity. We discuss each of these factors with reference to both the academic and the grey (non-academic) literature, and based on this make general recommendations for those designing and running citizen science projects.

AB - New citizen science projects are emerging all the time as scientists, policy-makers, and non-governmental organisations see the value of conducting research in this way. Understanding what factors influence people to take part in citizen science projects and why participants continue their involvement are important questions for the field. Here, we bring together key theories from the volunteering literature with examples from the environmental volunteering and citizen science literature to describe the factors that influence people to start and continue participating in citizen science projects. Good project organisation is key, and project organisers need to consider potential participants’ motivations; their personal attributes, circumstances and demographics; and how they will become aware of the opportunity. We discuss each of these factors with reference to both the academic and the grey (non-academic) literature, and based on this make general recommendations for those designing and running citizen science projects.

U2 - 10.5334/cstp.8

DO - 10.5334/cstp.8

M3 - Article

VL - 1

JO - Citizen Science: Theory and Practice

JF - Citizen Science: Theory and Practice

SN - 2057-4991

IS - 2

ER -