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Rethinking military gaming: America's army and its critics

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Rethinking military gaming : America's army and its critics. / Schulzke, Marcus.

In: Games and Culture, Vol. 8, No. 2, 03.2013, p. 59-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Schulzke, M 2013, 'Rethinking military gaming: America's army and its critics', Games and Culture, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 59-76. https://doi.org/10.1177/1555412013478686

APA

Schulzke, M. (2013). Rethinking military gaming: America's army and its critics. Games and Culture, 8(2), 59-76. https://doi.org/10.1177/1555412013478686

Vancouver

Schulzke M. Rethinking military gaming: America's army and its critics. Games and Culture. 2013 Mar;8(2):59-76. https://doi.org/10.1177/1555412013478686

Author

Schulzke, Marcus. / Rethinking military gaming : America's army and its critics. In: Games and Culture. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 59-76.

Bibtex - Download

@article{55e2b36f8c8240b38103ccf6563997a9,
title = "Rethinking military gaming: America's army and its critics",
abstract = "With the extensive use of military force by the U.S. government over the past decade, more scholarly attention has been directed at how mass culture is mobilized to support military objectives. Video games designed by the military or by civilians collaborating with military advisers are one of the major causes for concern, as these may provide ways of training players for military service or of building support for wars. This essay organizes prominent critiques of military gaming into structural/institutional, instrumental, and ideological perspectives and examines some of the most common arguments made from each. It argues that while critics of America's Army and other military games are right to be cautious about military influence on gaming, critics tend to judge military games more harshly than the evidence warrants.",
keywords = "America's Army, military entertainment, military games, propaganda, video games",
author = "Marcus Schulzke",
year = "2013",
month = mar,
doi = "10.1177/1555412013478686",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "59--76",
journal = "Games and Culture",
issn = "1555-4120",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rethinking military gaming

T2 - America's army and its critics

AU - Schulzke, Marcus

PY - 2013/3

Y1 - 2013/3

N2 - With the extensive use of military force by the U.S. government over the past decade, more scholarly attention has been directed at how mass culture is mobilized to support military objectives. Video games designed by the military or by civilians collaborating with military advisers are one of the major causes for concern, as these may provide ways of training players for military service or of building support for wars. This essay organizes prominent critiques of military gaming into structural/institutional, instrumental, and ideological perspectives and examines some of the most common arguments made from each. It argues that while critics of America's Army and other military games are right to be cautious about military influence on gaming, critics tend to judge military games more harshly than the evidence warrants.

AB - With the extensive use of military force by the U.S. government over the past decade, more scholarly attention has been directed at how mass culture is mobilized to support military objectives. Video games designed by the military or by civilians collaborating with military advisers are one of the major causes for concern, as these may provide ways of training players for military service or of building support for wars. This essay organizes prominent critiques of military gaming into structural/institutional, instrumental, and ideological perspectives and examines some of the most common arguments made from each. It argues that while critics of America's Army and other military games are right to be cautious about military influence on gaming, critics tend to judge military games more harshly than the evidence warrants.

KW - America's Army

KW - military entertainment

KW - military games

KW - propaganda

KW - video games

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84876531606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1555412013478686

DO - 10.1177/1555412013478686

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84876531606

VL - 8

SP - 59

EP - 76

JO - Games and Culture

JF - Games and Culture

SN - 1555-4120

IS - 2

ER -