By the same authors

Routine participation in sports and fitness activities among out-patients with psychotic disorders: A multi-site cross-sectional survey in England

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Publication details

JournalMental Health and Physical Activity
DateAccepted/In press - 19 Apr 2021
DateE-pub ahead of print (current) - 2 May 2021
Volume20
Number of pages9
Pages (from-to)1-9
Early online date2/05/21
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Background
Sedentary lifestyle is a significant contributor to poor outcomes in people with psychotic disorders. However, little is known about the extent of routine participation in specific sports and fitness activities among those who do take part. We investigated the frequency, intensity, time and type of sports and fitness activities (“fitness”) completed by people with psychotic disorders in their daily life and explored correlates associated with fitness participation.

Methods
We conducted a cross-sectional survey among out-patients with psychotic disorders (n = 529) recruited from six different NHS sites in England. Subjective participation in fitness activities during the previous week was assessed by an adaptation of the UK Time Use Survey. The main outcome was whether participants met the minimum World Health Organization recommendations for moderate intensity physical activity (≥150 min/week) through fitness. Poisson regression models with robust error variance were used to examine associations of this outcome with participant variables.

Results
In total, 267 (52.2%) participants reported taking part in routine fitness activities in the previous week, many of whom did so alone (n = 163, 59.1%). Only 21.5% (n = 114) completed ≥150 min of fitness activities in the previous week. The likelihood of attaining these recommendations was lower among participants who were female, older in age, in a relationship, unemployed and with fewer social contacts.

Conclusion
Mental health services promoting physical activity interventions among people with psychotic disorders may need to modify their approaches based on previous patient preference and increase their focus on sub-groups of patients who are less likely to routinely engage in fitness activities.

    Research areas

  • Psychosis; Physical activity; Sports; Fitness; Exercise

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