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Selectivity for mid‐level properties of faces and places in the fusiform face area and parahippocampal place area

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JournalThe European Journal of Neuroscience
DateAccepted/In press - 18 Dec 2018
DateE-pub ahead of print - 20 Jan 2019
DatePublished (current) - 20 Jun 2019
Issue number12
Volume49
Number of pages10
Pages (from-to)1587 - 1596
Early online date20/01/19
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Regions in the ventral visual pathway, such as the fusiform face area (FFA) and parahippocampal place area (PPA), are selective for images from specific object categories. Yet images from different object categories differ in their image properties. To investigate how these image properties are represented in the FFA and PPA, we compared neural responses to locally-scrambled images (in which mid-level, spatial properties are preserved) and globally-scrambled images (in which mid-level, spatial properties are not preserved). There was a greater response in the FFA and PPA to images from the preferred category relative to their non-preferred category for the scrambled conditions. However, there was a greater selectivity for locally-scrambled compared to globally-scrambled images. Next, we compared the magnitude of fMR adaptation to intact and scrambled images. fMR-adaptation was evident to locally-scrambled images from the preferred category. However, there was no adaptation to globally-scrambled images from the preferred category. These results show that the selectivity to faces and places in the FFA and PPA is dependent on mid-level properties of the image that are preserved by local scrambling.

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© 2018 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details.

    Research areas

  • face processing, fMRI, object vision, visual cortex

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