By the same authors

From the same journal

Social Media and Local Government: citizenship, consumption and democracy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Social Media and Local Government : citizenship, consumption and democracy. / Ellison, Nicholas Richard Branhall; Hardey, Michael.

In: Local government studies, Vol. 40, No. 1, 2, 01.01.2014, p. 21-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Ellison, NRB & Hardey, M 2014, 'Social Media and Local Government: citizenship, consumption and democracy', Local government studies, vol. 40, no. 1, 2, pp. 21-40.

APA

Ellison, N. R. B., & Hardey, M. (2014). Social Media and Local Government: citizenship, consumption and democracy. Local government studies, 40(1), 21-40. [2].

Vancouver

Ellison NRB, Hardey M. Social Media and Local Government: citizenship, consumption and democracy. Local government studies. 2014 Jan 1;40(1):21-40. 2.

Author

Ellison, Nicholas Richard Branhall ; Hardey, Michael. / Social Media and Local Government : citizenship, consumption and democracy. In: Local government studies. 2014 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 21-40.

Bibtex - Download

@article{f561b78cc1804c39a3c05086c7beff44,
title = "Social Media and Local Government: citizenship, consumption and democracy",
abstract = "This article seeks to assess and understand the role played by new forms of internet-based communication in UK local governance. Drawing on a survey of all English local authorities the article examines the utilisation of social media before going on to ask what potential these media might hold for the enhancement of local participation. Amidst contemporary debates about the nature of local governance, not least those prompted by the recent preoccupation with the Big Society, Web 2.0 platforms such as Facebook and Twitter afford new opportunities for online interaction that could contribute to the reinvigoration of the local public sphere. In particular these platforms could encourage forms of participation that would bridge the divide that has emerged in recent years between residents as consumers of local services and residents as citizens, or local democratic actors.",
author = "Ellison, {Nicholas Richard Branhall} and Michael Hardey",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "21--40",
journal = "Local government studies",
issn = "0300-3930",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social Media and Local Government

T2 - citizenship, consumption and democracy

AU - Ellison, Nicholas Richard Branhall

AU - Hardey, Michael

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - This article seeks to assess and understand the role played by new forms of internet-based communication in UK local governance. Drawing on a survey of all English local authorities the article examines the utilisation of social media before going on to ask what potential these media might hold for the enhancement of local participation. Amidst contemporary debates about the nature of local governance, not least those prompted by the recent preoccupation with the Big Society, Web 2.0 platforms such as Facebook and Twitter afford new opportunities for online interaction that could contribute to the reinvigoration of the local public sphere. In particular these platforms could encourage forms of participation that would bridge the divide that has emerged in recent years between residents as consumers of local services and residents as citizens, or local democratic actors.

AB - This article seeks to assess and understand the role played by new forms of internet-based communication in UK local governance. Drawing on a survey of all English local authorities the article examines the utilisation of social media before going on to ask what potential these media might hold for the enhancement of local participation. Amidst contemporary debates about the nature of local governance, not least those prompted by the recent preoccupation with the Big Society, Web 2.0 platforms such as Facebook and Twitter afford new opportunities for online interaction that could contribute to the reinvigoration of the local public sphere. In particular these platforms could encourage forms of participation that would bridge the divide that has emerged in recent years between residents as consumers of local services and residents as citizens, or local democratic actors.

M3 - Article

VL - 40

SP - 21

EP - 40

JO - Local government studies

JF - Local government studies

SN - 0300-3930

IS - 1

M1 - 2

ER -