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From the same journal

Socialising disease: Medical categories and inclusion of the aged

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Socialising disease : Medical categories and inclusion of the aged. / Latimer, Joanna.

In: The Sociological Review, Vol. 48, No. 3, 08.2000, p. 383-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Latimer, J 2000, 'Socialising disease: Medical categories and inclusion of the aged', The Sociological Review, vol. 48, no. 3, pp. 383-407.

APA

Latimer, J. (2000). Socialising disease: Medical categories and inclusion of the aged. The Sociological Review, 48(3), 383-407.

Vancouver

Latimer J. Socialising disease: Medical categories and inclusion of the aged. The Sociological Review. 2000 Aug;48(3):383-407.

Author

Latimer, Joanna. / Socialising disease : Medical categories and inclusion of the aged. In: The Sociological Review. 2000 ; Vol. 48, No. 3. pp. 383-407.

Bibtex - Download

@article{5d0b8fc4eaef4eca805a302d04316533,
title = "Socialising disease: Medical categories and inclusion of the aged",
abstract = "When older peoples' troubles are categorised as social rather than medical, hospital care can be denied them. Drawing on an ethnography of older people admitted as emergencies to an acute medical unit, the article demonstrates how medical categories can provide shelter for older people. By holding their clinical identity on medical rather than social grounds, physicians who specialise in gerontology in the acute medical domain can help prevent the over-socialising of an older person's health troubles. As well as helping the older person to draw certain resources to themselves, such as treatment and care, this inclusion in positive medical categories can provide shelter for the older person, to keep at bay their effacement as 'social problems'. These findings suggest that contemporary sociological critique of biomedicine may underestimate how medical categorising, as the obligatory passage through which to access important resources and life chances, can constitute a process of social inclusion.",
author = "Joanna Latimer",
year = "2000",
month = aug,
language = "English",
volume = "48",
pages = "383--407",
journal = "The Sociological Review",
issn = "0038-0261",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Socialising disease

T2 - Medical categories and inclusion of the aged

AU - Latimer, Joanna

PY - 2000/8

Y1 - 2000/8

N2 - When older peoples' troubles are categorised as social rather than medical, hospital care can be denied them. Drawing on an ethnography of older people admitted as emergencies to an acute medical unit, the article demonstrates how medical categories can provide shelter for older people. By holding their clinical identity on medical rather than social grounds, physicians who specialise in gerontology in the acute medical domain can help prevent the over-socialising of an older person's health troubles. As well as helping the older person to draw certain resources to themselves, such as treatment and care, this inclusion in positive medical categories can provide shelter for the older person, to keep at bay their effacement as 'social problems'. These findings suggest that contemporary sociological critique of biomedicine may underestimate how medical categorising, as the obligatory passage through which to access important resources and life chances, can constitute a process of social inclusion.

AB - When older peoples' troubles are categorised as social rather than medical, hospital care can be denied them. Drawing on an ethnography of older people admitted as emergencies to an acute medical unit, the article demonstrates how medical categories can provide shelter for older people. By holding their clinical identity on medical rather than social grounds, physicians who specialise in gerontology in the acute medical domain can help prevent the over-socialising of an older person's health troubles. As well as helping the older person to draw certain resources to themselves, such as treatment and care, this inclusion in positive medical categories can provide shelter for the older person, to keep at bay their effacement as 'social problems'. These findings suggest that contemporary sociological critique of biomedicine may underestimate how medical categorising, as the obligatory passage through which to access important resources and life chances, can constitute a process of social inclusion.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034238213&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0034238213

VL - 48

SP - 383

EP - 407

JO - The Sociological Review

JF - The Sociological Review

SN - 0038-0261

IS - 3

ER -